So Many Steller Sea Lions!

Monday September 25, 2017 – M.V. Lukwa

So many Steller Sea Lions were hauled out today.

Stunning scenery is always and element on our tours.

A Blad Eagle at the top of a tree.

Moonstar the Humpback Whale seen here Trap Feeding.

Two fish-eating Orca travelling together.

Pacific Harbour Seals come in all sizes and colours.

Steller Sea Lions resting together.

Moonstar the Humpback Whale could be seen trap feeding for a considerable amount of time today.

Ridge the Humpback Whale surfaces.

Northern Resident (fish-eating) Orca comes up for air.

Today’s Sightings: Humpback Whales (Moonstar, Ridge, Ripple, ), Northern Resident (fish-eating) Orca (A34s, G01s, I31s) Pacific White-sided Dolphins, Pacific Harbour Seals, Steller Sea Lions, Bald Eagles, Rhinoceros Auklets, Red-necked Phalaropes, Ancient Murrelets and Common Murres.

You just never know what is going to happen in nature. This is an ongoing theme ever since this company opened its doors in 1980. The wild is always unpredictable, marvellous and exciting.

Today we had a few surprises. Starting with the return of Northern Resident (fish-eating) Orca. Thanks to the work of Orcalab we can tell you that these matrilines were the G01s, I31s and the A34s. It was a wonderful sightings as the whales were vocalizing and we were able to listen in on their acoustic world. A world that is so integral to them. The whales were spread out and foraging for fish as we watched them wiggling at the surface.

Speaking of fish, Humpback Whale feeding continues in our are as these whales prepare for their upcoming migration to Hawaii or Mexico in the fall. We watched today as Moonstar the Humpback Whale could be seen trap feeding at the surface for a considerable period of time. It was mind blowing to sit their and observe this whale rotating at the surface with his/her mouth wide open. Guest on board were able to get a look at Moonstar’s baleen and palette with the help of binoculars.

The Steller Sea Lions all seemed to be on the one haul out today and there were a lot of them. It was interesting to see them resting side by side and at times even on top of one another. There has been so many individuals as of late that in the quiet hours of the evening we can sometimes make out their growl even in the cove.

Pacific Harbour Seals continue to be a wonderful sighting on our tours. They are so diverse in size and colour it can be quite mesmerizing. Did you know their different colour fur is a result of genetics.

Hard to believe with all this activity that our season here in Telegraph Cove is beginning to wind down. Only 2 short weeks left of amazing viewing before we close our doors for this year. Book soon, you don’t want to miss out on September. It has been mind blowing out there.

Photo credits: Jennie Leaver and Alison Ogilvie. Photos are all property of Stubbs Island Whale Watching. All photos are taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

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Dolphins and Humpback Whales are the Highlight Today’s Tours.

Sunday September 24, 2017 – M.V. Lukwa

A trap feeding Humpback Whale with beautiful mountains in the background.

Today’s Sightings: Humpback Whales (Corporal,Freckles,Tangent, Galaxy, Slash, Corporal, Lucky and Inukshuk), Pacific White-sided Dolphins, Pacific Harbour Seals, Steller Sea Lions,, Bald Eagles, Rhinoceros Auklets, Red-necked Phalaropes, Peregrine Falcon and Common Murres.

A Steller Sea Lions is hauled out in beautiful light.

Galaxy and Argonaut fluke in unison.

Galaxy and Argonaut the Humpback Whale surface in unison.

This Humpback Whale was in a really interesting position as we could see his/her baleen, pec flipper and dorsal.

A lunge feeding Humpback Whale.

Pacific Harbour Seals

The scenery is stunning and made even more breathtaking by this fluking Humpback Whale.

A trap feeding Humpback Whale with beautiful mountains in the background.

A Steller Sea Lions is hauled out in beautiful light.

Hundreds of Pacific White-sided Dolphins rip around at the surface.

Today was a wonderful day on the water off of Northeast Vancouver Island.

We were very lucky on today’s tour to witness a Humpback Whale behaviour that has only been documented by researchers (The Marine Education and Research Society) in this population of Humpback Whales and it is called Trap Feeding. Trap Feeding is when a Humpback Whale sits at the surface of the water with his/her mouth wide open and rotating it in order to trap small fish it is eating. Super cool to see in person. Note the picture above.

Speaking of Humpback Whales, we continue to see blows everywhere we look as of late. There was a lot of feeding activity as we scouted bird activity everywhere. Multiple Humpback Whales could be seen lunge feeding sometimes even in pairs. Always an interesting moment when we spot two of these giants travelling together. Guests watched today as Argonaut and Galaxy were seen side by side and even fluked in tandem.

Pacific White-sided Dolphins continue to be in the area. We watched as hundred of dolphins appeared to be feeding. The dolphins were squalling, often moving quiet quickly and circling around in one area. They were creating rips at the surface and would then slow down for a period of time before speeding up again. The bird activity above them was an indication that they were catching fish. Then on our return to Telegraph Cove we came across the dolphins once more. They were still behaving similarly to the way they were before but now Slash the Humpback Whale was mixed in with them.

Steller Sea Lions could be seen hauled out, swimming in the water and at times even whacking fish. In fact, at one time, we noticed there was a sea lion even mixed in with the Pacific White-sided Dolphins. The brown back and different swimming technique tipped us off.

To quote our head naturalist Alison, “This area is truly remarkable and September is her favourite time of year to be on the water.” Book your tour with us soon and find out why.

Photo credits: Alison Ogilvie and Jennie Leaver. All photos are property of Stubbs Island Whale Watching and were taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

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September Continues to be Amazing!

Saturday September 23, 2017 – M.V. Lukwa

Yahtzee the Humpback Whale cartwheeling.

A superb look at a swimming Steller Sea Lion.

Echo (A55) of the A34 matriline of Northern Resident (fish-eating) Orca.

Pacific Harbour Seals come in all colours and sizes.

Northern Resident (fish-eating) Orcas pass through Johnstone Strait with stunning mountains in the distance.

Steller Sea Lions.

A Humpback Whale (Piza) surfaces in the foggy morning conditions.

Pacific White-sided Dolphins porpoise after the fish-eating Killer Whales.

Northern Resident (fish-eating) Orca are surrounded by Pacific White-sided Dolphins. Can you spot the dolphin?

Yahtzee the Humpback Whale tail lobbing.

Today’s Sightings: Humpback Whales (Hilroy, Domino, Slash, Frosty, Mini Wheat, Corporal and more), Northern Resident Orca (A34s, I15s) Pacific White-sided Dolphins, Pacific Harbour Seals, Steller Sea Lions, Bald Eagles, Rhinoceros Auklets, Red-necked Phalaropes and Common Murres.

Both tours today were spectacular and completely stunning on the eyes. In the morning we had a very misty and west coast atmosphere that quickly cleared to give way to a sunny September afternoon.

There were acrobatic Humpback Whales in the morning, as Yahtzee tail lobbed and cartwheeled for almost a half an hour. Meanwhile on the other side of the boat Frosty and her calf, Mini Wheat were lunge feeding. Look left, look right, look left, look right again! Suddenly, Frosty breached and guests on board could make out her entire figure mid-air. Super cool! Humpback feeding activity continued into the afternoon as we saw more lunge feeding and bird activity.

The Northern Resident (fish-eating) Orca returned to our area on the 1pm tour. We had fantastic sightings of the A34 and I15 matrilines as they made their way along the Vancouver Island Shoreline. The lightening in combination with the calm conditions and the green hue in the water made this sighting absolutely stunning. The whales were also surrounded by Pacific White-sided Dolphins who were at times acrobatic.

Steller Sea Lions were hauled out, swimming everywhere and at times even seen whacking a fish at the surface. The Pacific Harbour Seals who were hauled out today were all different colours and sizes. Ever wonder about how Pacific Harbour Seals end up with different colour fur? It’s genetic!

The last few days have been just draw dropping. The scenery in this area is enough to make your heart skip a beat all on its own, but when you combine this with the awesome lightening conditions, calm seas and incredible wildlife it is absolutely beyond words. Join us for a tour and check it out for yourself.

Photo credits: Alison Ogilvie and Jennie Leaver. Photos taken with a telephoto lens and cropped. All photos are the property of Stubbs Island Whale Watching.

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Hungry Hungry Humpbacks!

Friday September 22, 2017 – M.V. Lukwa

Ripping through the surface in this epic lunge feed. Pretty cool, you can make out the baleen in this Humpback Whale’s mouth.

Today’s Sightings: Humpback Whales (Freckles, Conger, Hilroy, Domino, Slash, Hunter, Merge, Frosty, Mini Wheat, Glacier, Inukshuk and Jigger), Pacific White-sided Dolphins, Pacific Harbour Seals, Steller Sea Lions, Black-tailed Deer, Dall’s Porpoise, Bald Eagles, Rhinoceros Auklets, Red-necked Phalaropes and Common Murres.

We had two tours today at 9am and 1pm. There was an enormous amount of Humpback Feeding going on. We also got great looks and other species like Pacific White-sided Dolphins, Steller Sea Lions and Pacific Harbour Seals.

A wonderful look at the diversity of Pacific Harbour Seals.

The throat pleats of a Humpback Whale as it lunge feed on his/her side.

A Black-tailed Deer feeds on Rock Kelp.

This Humpback Whale (Domnio) came catapulting out of the water in this lunge feed.

Pacific White-sided Dolphins passed by while in a resting mode.

Sitting at the surface mouth wide open. This Humpback Whale was scooping fish into his/her mouth using his/her pectoral flippers.

Steller Sea Lions in huge numbers as of late.

Frosty and her calf Mini Wheat.

We often talk about birds feeding at the surface on bait balls. Here is a great example of that.

Trap feeding Humpback Whale Conger.

Photo credits: Jennie Leaver and Alison Ogilvie. All photos are property of Stubbs Island Whale Watching and were taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

 

 

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A Killer Day

Thursday September 21, 2017 – M.V. Lukwa

Flip flopping Northern Resident (fish-eating) Orca.

Today’s Sightings: Humpback Whales (Inukshuk, Piza, Glacier, Hunter, Conger and Freckles ),Northern Resident Killer Whales (A34s and I15s), Pacific White-sided Dolphins, Pacific Harbour Seals, Steller Sea Lions, Dall’s Porpoise, Bald Eagles, Rhinoceros Auklets, Red-necked Phalaropes and Common Murres.

It is really hard to put into words and do justice to what we were able to see today. Instead take a look at some of today’s amazing sightings in the photos below. 

An incredible capture of this Pacific White-sided Dolphin as it came up for a breathe.

Inukshuk the Humpback Whale flukes.

Amazing conditions as we watched the A34s and I15s travel down Johnstone Strait in the afternoon.

Steller Sea Lions haul out in the lovely sun.

Spy Hop! From this Northern Resident Orca.

Today we saw huge groups of Pacific White-sided Dolphins.

This Humpback Whale was posturing while being harassed by a group of dolphins.

Echo (A55) of the A34 matriline.

The fluke of Hunter the Humpback Whale.

A group of Northern Resident (fish-eating) Orca travel in a resting line.

This Humpback Whale was posturing while being harassed by a group of dolphins.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie and Jennie Leaver. All photos are property of Stubbs Island Whale Watching and were taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

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Off the Charts!

Wednesday September 20, 2017 – M.V. Lukwa

An awesome lunge feed from Corporal the Humpback Whale.

 

 

 

Steller Sea Lions haul out in the sunny afternoon conditions.

This Northern Resident (fish-eating) Orca porpoising after a fish.

A Steller Sea Lion whacking a fish.

Ripple the Humpback Whale lunge feed completely vertical. Super cool!

Bald Eagle soars above.

A juvenile Northern Resident (fish-eating) Orca Spy Hops while travelling with his/her family.

Freckles the Humpback Whale seemed to be propelling herself using her pectoral flippers here while feeding.

Pacific Harbour Seal numbers have been astonishing lately.

Awesome lighting as this Humpback surfaced on the morning tour.

Northern Resident (fish-eating) Orca could be heard vocalizing above and below the surface this morning.

Today’s Sightings: Humpback Whales (Corporal, Ripple, Freckles, Piza, Claw, Domino and many many more.),Northern Resident Killer Whales (A34s), Pacific Harbour Seals, Steller Sea Lions, Dall’s Porpoise, Bald Eagles, Rhinoceros Auklets, Red-necked Phalaropes, Peregrine Falcon and Common Murres.

Today was EPIC!

We were very lucky to get a report early in the morning that the Northern Resident Killer Whales had come back into our area. Guests on both morning and afternoon tours were privileged to some awesome sightings of these whales. On both tours the whales were very vocal and guests on board were able to listen to some amazing calls. We heard both A and G Clan calls today but were only able to identify the A34 matriline. There were two very special moments today. In the morning we could hear the whales vocalizing not only on our hydrophone but above the surface as well. In the afternoon guests got a great look as one of the whales porpoised out of the water after a fish.

Humpback Whale activity today was mind blowing as well. As these giant whales continue to prepare for their upcoming migration, they are eating as much as possible. We watched as bait ball after bait ball formed and was subsequently fed upon. The lunge feeds seemed extra awesome today. We watched as Ripple came straight up from underneath, giving guests a great chance to see her entire head and throat pleats. Then Corporal lunge feed so energetically you could make out the baleen and could see his/her pectoral flippers (pictured above). We were also privy to numerous tail flukes and dorsals. Just awesome!

Steller Sea Lions were everywhere as well. Not only were the sea lions at their commonly known haul out but they seemed to swimming both in the passes and in many locations in Blackfish Sound. We watched a few sea lions swam around Claw the Humpback Whale and then shortly after we were able to watched how they feed. A Steller Sea Lion could bee seen at the surface ripping a fish apart while Sea Gulls scooped down to pick up the scraps.

Pacific Harbour Seals continue to astound us with the sheer number of individuals we see and we watched a few Bald Eagles soaring above and perched in tree tops. A breath taking moment as we watched one swoop in for a fish. The Eagle missed this time, but was still enthralling to see him/her in action.

Words cannot do justice to everything that is happening here right now. You just have to get out on the water and see it for yourself. You won’t be disappointed!

Photo credits: Jennie Leaver and Alison Ogilvie. Photos are all property of Stubbs Island Whale Watching and were taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

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Lunge Feeding Humpbacks

Tuesday September 19, 2017 – M.V. Lukwa

The awesome sight of a lunge feeding Humpback Whale.

 

 

Pacific Harbour Seals hauled out in the September sun.

Water beads off this Humpback Whale as it flukes.

Beautiful scenery today!

Black-tailed Deer forage on the greenery of this small island.

The blow lingers in the air as this Humpback Whale surfaces.

A mature Bald Eagle sits in this lichen draped tree.

Pacific White-sided Dolphins create spray at the surface.

Hunter the Humpback Whale in the beautiful glassy calm conditions.

Steller Sea Lions hauled out and swimming in the water.

Today’s Sightings: Humpback Whales (Hunter, Conger, Ripple, Yahtzee, Slash, Freckles, Domino, Cosmo, Piza and many many more), Pacific White-sided Dolphins, Pacific Harbour Seals, Steller Sea Lions, Dall’s Porpoise, Black-tailed Deer, Bald Eagles, Rhinoceros Auklets, Red-necked Phalaropes, Peregrine Falcon and Common Murres.

We could not beat the conditions on today’s tour. The weather was picture perfect, with sunny blue skies and little to no wind. This makes sightings of marine mammals a lot easier as well because you can see every ripple at the surface. Humpback Whale blows could be seen for miles in the afternoon light and it is evident there are a lot of whales around right now.

We had some interesting bird activity at one point today as we watched a Peregrine Falcon chasing down a SeaGull. Peregrine Falcons are hunting birds and are incredibly quick. Very interesting to see these hunting birds whip around in the sky after other birds.

Smaller marine mammals abounded today as we continue to see huge numbers of Pacific Harbour Seals and Steller Sea Lions. Both species were hauled out and in the water today. As we travelled in the small passages of the Plumper Islands we could see the small heads of Pacific Harbour Seals popping up in the Bull Kelp numerous times.

Speaking of smaller marine mammals we were lucky to see some Pacific White-sided Dolphins as of late. Today we came across a small group of dolphins who appeared to be at rest. They were travelling quite slowly and very tight together. Cool fact about dolphins at rest, did you know in order to rest they shut down half their brain at a time? Later in our trip we came across the dolphins once more but this time they were definitely not at rest. We could see them ripping along at the surface and creating a fair amount of spray.

Then last, but certainly far from least, there were a plethora of Humpback Whales spotted on our tour. Our on board naturalist Alison estimates we saw at least 15 different individuals today. There was a lot of bird activity as guests watched multiple lunge feeds. A sight that is always exciting and requires a lot of patience. We watched as Seagulls fed at the surface for many minutes before the Humpback broke the surface, mouth wide open.

September just continues to get better everyday. We are extremely lucky that the weather continues to be amazing in addition to some incredible activity. Every day is an exciting adventure. We just never know what is going to happen.

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Its All Happening Here!

Monday September 18, 2017 – M.V. Lukwa

So many Pacific Harbour Seals were hauled out today.

One of the A34s Spy Hops.

A Pacific White-sided Dolphin catapults from the surface.

Steller Sea Lions.

A great look at the dorsal of Inukshuk the Humpback Whale.

A mature Bald Eagle.

A great close up look at one of the hauled out Pacific Harbour Seals.

Echo (A55) or the A34 matriline of Northern Resident (fish-eating) Orca.

Pacific White-sided Dolphins leap in towards one another.

The tail of Inukshuk the Humpback Whale.

Today’s Sightings: Humpback Whales (Inukshuk, Argonaut Claw and Ridge), Northern Resident Orca (A34s) Pacific White-sided Dolphins, Pacific Harbour Seals, Steller Sea Lions, Bald Eagles, Rhinoceros Auklets, Red-necked Phalaropes, and Common Murres.

There was clear evidence today as to why this is one of the best locations on earth to go whale watching. No matter where we were today you could always see Telegraph Cove in the background and we saw a lot.

Pacific White-sided Dolphins were everywhere it felt like. Racing from one whale to another they mobbed both the Northern Resident (fish-eating) Orcas as well as Inukshuk the Humpback Whale. There were wonderful moments of viewing these very acrobatic dolphins who were seen ripping along at the surface, sometimes porpoising and sometimes just jumping clear out into the air. It was absolutely incredible to see.

Inukshuk the Humpback Whale was often surrounded by the dolphins. He/she was heard trumpeting quite loudly and at times creating a little bit of a splash at the surface either using his/her tail or perhaps at times his/her pectoral flippers. There were actually numerous Humpback Whales around today. Prior to seeing Inukshuk mobbed by dolphins we also saw Claw and Ridge who were both doing quite shallow dives and not showing their tail.

Meanwhile while all of this was going on we were also watching the Northern Resident (A34s) Orca. Everything was happening in one place today and it was marvellous. We watched as this matriline of fish-eating Orca slowly travelled together. They dolphins also took an interest in the Orca as we watched on numerous occasions as they surrounded them and worked their way from individual to individual. While watching this matriline travel there were a few moments of excitement! One individual porpoised a few times, racing across the surface and there were multiple spy hops.

Pacific Harbour Seals were hauled out in many locations and at such varying heights. They were very dry looking and also looking quite plump which is nice to see.

The Steller Sea Lions were hauled out in their usual locations. We listened as they growled at one another and watched as they climbed over one another. There was a cool moment when we could see three or four different individuals scratching their chins with their flippers all at the same time.

Hard to imagine that all this was happening pretty much at the same time and in the same general location. You can imaging how hard it was to decide which direction to look. What a super duper September day!

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. All photos are property of Stubbs Island Whale Watching and were taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

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Record Number of Humpbacks This Season!

Sunday September 17, 2017 – M.V. Lukwa

Yahtzee lunge feeds on a “bait ball” of juvenile Herring.

Steller Sea Lions were hauled out and swimming in the water.

Squiggle the Humpback Whale lunge feed super high out of the water.

A mating pair of Bald Eagles. Can you tell which one is the female? (hint: she’s the bigger bird.)

Lunge feeding Humpback Whale! Pretty neat to get a good look at the throat pleats.

The darker coloured bird is a hunting bird called a Jaeger.

Yahtzee did this huge arching fluke and then shortly after lunge feed.

Frosty and her calf Mini Wheat fluke in tandem.

Squiggle the Humpback Whale.

Beautiful lighting as the blow of this Humpback Whale lingered in the air.

Today’s Sightings: Humpback Whales (Argonaut, Ashes, Yahtzee, Conger, Freckles, Frosty, Mini Wheat, Squiggle, Chunky, Free Throw, Claw, Lucky, Domino, Cosmo, Piza, Hilroy, Corporal and possibly more), Pacific Harbour Seals, Steller Sea Lions, Jaeger, Bald Eagles, Rhinoceros Auklets, Red-necked Phalaropes, Pelagic Cormorants and Common Murres.

My oh my, oh my! We had a record day at Stubbs Island Whale Watching this season, with sightings of at least 18 Humpback Whales. It is hard to know for sure as we were seeing so many and so much was happening, but we know for sure there was at least 18 whales out their today. Talk about awesome!

Today’s trip had some guests a little apprehensive because of the weather. While it poured rain in Telegraph Cove all morning we were very lucky that it cleared almost immediately into our trip today. Guests braved a little bit of a downpour initially but then blue skies appeared and it was lovely viewing.

Before Humpback activity really started to amp up, we already had sightings of two whales. We then made our way over to a local Steller Sea Lion haul out where we could see many individuals both hauled out and swimming in the water. We love getting a look at their size, hearing them growl and watching their maneuverability in the water. Then a glimpse into one of the nearby tree tops, we spotted a mating pair of Bald Eagles. Sitting quite close together it was easy to tell which bird was the bigger one, which is also the female bird.

Then, off we went to an area where we typically see a lot of Humpback Whales – a place our head naturalist Alison calls “Humpback Central”. Central it was! On arrival we could see at least 7 whales within eyesight and tons of bird activity. Bird activity is something we look for that can often indicate a Humpback Whale might feed in the area. In fact it was hard to keep track of all the activity today. It was happening everywhere and on all sides of the boat.

We watched as “bait ball” after “bait ball” formed and was subsequently fed on. Huge mouths of Humpback Whales were seen gapping wide open and swallowing large amounts of juvenile Herring. After one whale fed, we watched as the bird activity increased again and the same whale or another whale fed again. There were blows and dorsal fins everywhere and then suddenly we saw the entire body of a Humpback Whale catapult into the air as a whale breached not to far in the distance.

We had a record breaking day, identifying 18 different Humpback Whales and there could have possibly been more out there! The feeding behaviour was just awesome and we even saw a hunting bird chasing a Seagull called a Jaeger.

This day left us energized and super excited about what tomorrow will bring. Make sure you don’t miss out.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver and Alison Ogilvie. All photos are property of Stubbs Island Whale Watching. Taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

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Super Sighting Saturday!

Saturday September 16, 2017 – M.V. Lukwa

T55s. Transient (mammal-eating) Killer Whales.

Today’s Sightings: Northern Resident Orca (A34s and A23s/A25s) Humpback Whales (Lucky, Argonaut, Conger, Chunky and more), Pacific White-sided Dolphins, Pacific Harbour Seals, Steller Sea Lions, Sea Otter Bald Eagles, Rhinoceros Auklets, Red-necked Phalaropes, Pelagic Cormorants and Common Murres.

A Bald Eagle perched on a Snag.

The unique tail of Lucky the Humpback Whale.

The A34s travelling in resting line formation.

Pacific Habour Seals were hauled out in numerous locations today.

A head on perspective of T55A of the T55 matriline of mammal-eating Killer Whales.

Steller Sea Lions pop their heads above the surface.

The dorsal of Lucky the Humpback Whale.

Echo (A55) a mature male from the A34 matriline or Northern Resident (fish-eating) Killer Whales.

Sea Gulls sitting on a log.

Today’s morning and afternoon tours were like the two sides of a coin. They were very different but you have to dive a little deeper to notice the nuances in these differences. In the morning it was overcast and fairly chilly with clam seas. In the afternoon the cold morning wind had blown away the cloud cover and we were blessed with clam seas but now sunny blue skies. The other contrast today, in the morning we saw Transient (mammal-eating) Killer Whales and in the afternoon we were fortunate to have sightings of the Northern Resident (fish-eating) Killer Whales. Like with the coin, these whales look very similar but in fact are extremely different.

We watched throughout the morning as the T55 matriline (Transient Killer Whales) travelled the waters around Weynton Pass and the Plumper Islands. They were displaying behaviour pretty typical to mammal-eaters, being quite quiet and taking long dives. The excitement picked up when we watched as they decided to travel a pass in the Plumper Islands. At one point in the pass they caught what we believe was likely a Harbour Seal. There was some circling at the surface and then we watched as Sea Gulls picked at the scraps from above. Big thanks to Jared Towers of DFO for the ID on this one.

Killer Whale sightings continued in the afternoon. As soon as we left Telegraph Cove and turned the corner there they were but this time they were fish-eaters. Very different from the whales we saw this morning. We watched the A23s/A25s as they foraged in the area. Then just behind them came the A34s. We lost sight of the A23s and A25s and continued watching as the A34s travelled quickly to the West. There were great looks as they were all grouped up in a resting line and a spectacular moment when one of the whales breached a few times.

Humpback Whale sightings were wonderful as well today. We saw multiple whales on both our morning and afternoon trips. At one point in the afternoon we were watching the A34s as a Humpback Whale lunge feed just behind them. Pretty cool. Feeding activity was prevalent on both morning and afternoon tours. We saw a few lunge feeds and multiple flukes. In the afternoon there was some increased surface activity and guests were able to witness a few whales tail lobbing.

Throughout the entire day we watched Steller Sea Lions and Pacific Harbour Seals who were both hauled out and at times seen swimming. Interesting to watch the reactions of both these species when the mammal-eating Killer Whales passed by them in the morning.

As with so many other days, it was truly spectacular and memorable for both us and our guests. Easy to see why we do whale watching outside of Telegraph Cove, we hardly even left the dock today before sightings started. Don’t miss out on these last 3 weeks. There is a reason we developed the hashtag #spectacularseptember.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver and Alison Ogilvie. Images are all property of Stubbs Island Whale Watching and were taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

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