Killer Whales of BC – Live Twitter Chat Transcript

Killer Whales of the BcCoast

Transcript of Live Chat – June 14th @ 11am on Twitter

  1. How are BC Killer Whale Ecotypes different?
    1. -They don’t mate with each other, have different diets and different foraging strategies.
  2. What are the different foraging strategies for each ecotype?
    1. Resident (fish-eating) Killer Whales are very vocal and use echolocation (biosonar) to locate their fish. Transient (mammal-eating) Killer Whales are stealthy and sneak up on their prey and typically do not vocalize. Offshore Killer whales forage in larger groups, spread out over a wide area.
  3.  How many ecotypes are there?
    1. – There are three different Ecotypes. Resident (fish-eating) Killer Whales, Transient (mammal-eating) Killer Whales and Offshore Killer Whales.
  4. Do all three types have biosonar?
    1. Yes
  5. Do baby Orcas always stay with their pods? Or do they move out when they grow up?
    1. Yes young Orcas always stay with Mom and for how long varies on each ecotype. Resident (fish-eating) Killer Whales stay with their mothers their entire lives.
  6. Orcas around North Vancouver Island are known to rub their bellies on beaches, can you tell us why they do this?
    1. Probably because it feels good but it could also be a way of building family bonds. It’s a social activity.
  7. How do you identify the different ecotypes?
    1. We can identify the different ecotypes by physical appearance and behaviour, as well as vocalizations. Resident Killer Whales spend more time at the surface than Transient Killer Whales, who have to be more stealthy.
  8. Have the Northern Residents been making frequent appearances in Telegraph Cove?
    1. We have only had one sighting of the Northern Residents this season. Likely there will be more predictable sightings from mid-July to mid-September.

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Whale School! Lessons from Mother Nature for Children and Adults

A mature Bald Eagle snacks in midair on one of the small fish, likely juvenile Herring, that it has caught.

A mature Bald Eagle snacks in midair on one of the small fish, likely juvenile Herring, that it has caught.

Tuesday June 13, 2017 – M.V. Lukwa

One of the members of the T059 family of Mammal-eating Killer Whales slaps its tail mid-hunt.

One of the members of the T059 family of Mammal-eating Killer Whales slaps its tail mid-hunt.

Whale School is in session! Students from the Wagalus School in Port Hardy learn about Mother Nature, in nature.

Whale School is in session! Students from the Wagalus School in Port Hardy learn about Mother Nature, in nature.

Ripple the Humpback Whale arches in preparation for a dive, with sailboats from the VanIsle360 race dotting the opposite side of Johnstone Strait.

Ripple the Humpback Whale arches in preparation for a dive, with sailboats from the VanIsle360 race dotting the opposite side of Johnstone Strait.

Two Rhinoceros Auklets brave the surface instead of diving down as a Bald Eagle swoops in for a talon-load of food.

Two Rhinoceros Auklets brave the surface instead of diving down as a Bald Eagle swoops in for a talon-load of food.

Fly-through feeding! Eagle after eagle descends in attempts to catch small fish.

Eating on the run! Or fly… See all the Herring in the talons and the one that escaped?

A young Mammal-eating Orca learns how to hunt with its family.

A young Mammal-eating Orca learns how to hunt with its family.

A Rhinoceros Auklet resurfacing after working below the surface to help school together small fish.

A Rhinoceros Auklet resurfacing after working below the surface to help school together small fish.

Fly-through feeding! Eagle after eagle descends in an attempt to catch small fish.

Fly-through feeding! Eagle after eagle descends in an attempt to catch small fish.

Pacific Harbour Seals resting on a seaweed-laden rock, safe (for now) from Mammal-eating Orcas.

Pacific Harbour Seals resting on a seaweed-laden rock, safe (for now) from Mammal-eating Orcas.

Some of the first finishers of the VanIsle360 challenge are secured and lowered their sails for a lay day in Telegraph Cove.

Some of the first finishers of the VanIsle360 challenge are secured and lowered their sails for a lay day in Telegraph Cove.

Today’s Sightings: Biggs Orcas (mammal hunting) (T059s), Humpback Whales (Conger, Ripple, Ojos Blancos), Dall’s Porpoises, Pacific Harbour Seals, Steller Sea Lions, Bald Eagles, Belted Kingfishers, Common Murres, and Rhinoceros Auklets.

Whale School was in session this morning, as students from Wagalus School on the North Island were lucky to be on board learning from mother nature. One by one, we watched over 15 Bald Eagles circle above a school of small fish. The eagles swooped down to grab talons full of the herring and ate them in the air as they flew away.

Then a big lesson from mother nature as we were fortunate to see a family of Mammal-eating Killer Whales, or Orcas, teaching their young to hunt a Pacific Harbour Seal. We learned that it is this type of killer whale’s job in nature to eat marine mammals and that is what they did. The students watched as the younger killer whales practised their hunting techniques, cartwheeling and sometimes even jumping right out of the water! It appears that the students were not the only ones at whale school this morning.

The excitement carried on into the afternoon trip, as we were fortunate enough to again see multiple Bald Eagles and Gulls fishing. The adults were just as amazed as the children had been, to witness and learn that eagles can eat while airborne and circle back for seconds (or thirds or more)! Rhinoceros Auklets dotted the surface, likely having done most of the work to school the Herring together.

Humpback Whales Ripple and Ojos Blancos circled, but we only got to see Ripple’s tail. 

In one of the passes that we sometimes quietly drift through, a vocal Belted Kingfisher broke the silence. Its calls followed the boat as it flitted between trees.

As we finished off the day, sailboats in the VanIsle360 race were making their way to the finish line of Telegraph Cove. The competitors will spend a day here before continuing on, so exciting!

Want to come see things like this for yourself? Book your trip today in store or online!

All photo credit to Stubbs Island Whale Watching, taken by Alison Ogilvie and Johanna Ferrie with a telephoto lens and cropped.

A Belted Kingfisher briefly rests on a branch before taking flight and vocalizing again.

A Belted Kingfisher briefly rests on a branch before taking flight and vocalizing again.

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Humpback Whales, Dolphins and a Steller Sea Lion…together!

Monday June 12, 2017 – M.V. Lukwa

One of around 300 Pacific White-sided Dolphins that we viewed on this afternoon's trip.

One of around 300 Pacific White-sided Dolphins that we viewed on this afternoon’s trip.

Captain Wayne thinks the next generation of captains is doing just great!

Captain Wayne thinks the next generation of captains is doing just great!

Conger the Humpback Whale being pestered by Pacific White-sided Dolphins.

Conger the Humpback Whale being pestered by Pacific White-sided Dolphins.

More incredible tidal activity today. This was a calmer, yet gorgeous section that just needed to be photographed.

More incredible tidal activity today. This was a calmer, yet gorgeous section that just needed to be photographed.

Ripple the Humpback Whale feeding in the tide rips.

Ripple the Humpback Whale feeding in the tide rips.

Today’s Sightings: Humpback Whales (Conger, Ripple and Ridge), Pacific White-sided Dolphins, Steller Sea Lion, Dall’s Porpoises Bald Eagles and Rhinoceros Auklets.

Yes, today we had a Humpback Whale, Pacific White-sided dolphins and a Steller Sea Lion all at the same time. There was a lot going on!

We watched as a group of over 300 Pacific White-sided Dolphins were traveling through Blackfish Sound, sometimes jumping right out of the water and choosing to come and travel along beside the Lukwa. Conger the Humpback Whale was close by, and it wasn’t long before the dolphins had noticed this too. They quickly swam over to Conger, swimming all over top of and around him/her. The whale, seemingly in frustration, could be heard trumpeting (making elephant type noises out of his/her blowhole), before fluking. Even though we couldn’t see the whale, we knew where it was because we could see the group of dolphins that followed it around. A Steller Sea Lion even joined the group of dolphins and guests got a fantastic look and these two species interacting.

Sightings of Ripple and Ridge the Humpback Whales and Dall’s Porpoises who chose to swim under the bow of the Lukwa finished off yet another fantastic afternoon.

Photo Credits: Alison Ogilvie. All photos belong to Stubbs Island Whale Watching. Images taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

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Wild! Untamed! Unexpected!

Sunday June 11, 2017 – M.V. Lukwa

A Black Bear forages for food along the shoreline

A Black Bear forages for food along the shoreline

Today’s Sightings: Humpback Whales (Squiggle, Guardian, Ripple, Conger and Black Pearl), Black Bear, Steller Sea Lion, Dall’s Porpoise, Bald Eagles and Rhinoceros Auklets.

A family we hosted today was on board tracking their heritage back to an old sawmill worked by an ancestor.

A family we hosted today was on board tracking their heritage back to an old sawmill worked by an ancestor.

Guardian the Humpback Whales flukes. You can see her distinct white markings.

Guardian the Humpback Whales flukes. You can see her distinct white markings.

A mature Bald Eagle soars by the boat.

A mature Bald Eagle soars by the boat.

A mature Bald Eagle sits perched on high.

A mature Bald Eagle sits perched on high.

 Water runs off the fluke of this Humpback Whale like a mini waterfall.

Water runs off the fluke of this Humpback Whale like a mini waterfall.

A Rhinocerous Aukelt. You can clearly make out the distinct horn like feature on the beak.

A Rhinocerous Aukelt. You can clearly make out the distinct horn like feature on the beak.

Beautiful snow-capped mountains marked our journey.

Beautiful snow-capped mountains marked our journey.

To be wild is to be uncontrolled or unrestrained, uncultivated and/or growing in the natural environment. It is an adventure into the unknown, into areas not dominated or controlled by humans. It is enough to get your heart racing and take your breath away all in one moment.

As we departed Telegraph Cove, we were privileged to have a large group today who were on board for a very special reason. They were tracing their family heritage back to an old mill where one of their distant relatives worked in the early 1900s. We were honoured to help facilitate and be part of your special moment.

We saw a lot of Humpback Whales today. Five to be exact. We watched as Squiggle, known for his/her unique dorsal fin surface and tail fluked multiple times. Then not long after we came across two more whales, known as Ripple and Guardian. Both seemed to be feeding in the tide rips. As guests watched in different directions, Guardian suddenly tail lobbed. So exciting when these giant whales catapult out of the water. Then we watched as Ripple and Guardian slowly started to converge on one another and then begin travelling together.

As we continued our journey we shortly got another report of two more Humpback Whales. Identified as Conger and another individual who were lunge feeding. Always a jaw dropping sight.

On our way back we were graced with wonderful snow capped mountains and then just when we thought we were heading home, a large black bear could be seen feeding on shore.

Overall just a spectacular day.

Photo Credits: Jennie Leaver and Johanna Ferrie. All photos belong to Stubbs Island Whale Watching. Images taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

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Listening to a Whale Breathe

Saturday June 10, 2017 – M.V. Lukwa

The exhalation of Ripple the Humpback Whale lingers, her nostrils visibly open to inhale.

The exhalation of Ripple the Humpback Whale lingers, her blowholes visibly open to inhale.

Today’s Sightings: Humpback Whales (Guardian and Ripple), Steller Sea Lions, Pacific

Two mature Bald Eagles sticking out from the grass.

Two mature Bald Eagles sticking out from the grass.

A Steller Sea Lion surfacing in calm waters sheltered from the flood tide.

A Steller Sea Lion surfacing in calm waters sheltered from the flood tide.

Gooseneck and Acorn Barnacles adorn the fluke, or tail, of Guardian the Humpback Whale.

Gooseneck and Acorn Barnacles adorn the fluke, or tail, of Guardian the Humpback Whale.

Do you see double? Another pair of Bald Eagles perch in a nest that has been active in previous years.

Do you see double? Another pair of Bald Eagles perch in a nest that has been active in previous years.

Upwellings and riptides show the power of the tides here.

Upwellings and riptides show the power of the tides here.

A very young looking Pacific Harbour Seal.

A very young looking Pacific Harbour Seal.

Harbour Seals, Bald Eagles, White-wing Scoters, and Rhinoceros Auklets.

Have you ever heard a whale breathe? It’s incredible. Such a powerful set of lungs, breathing the very same air that we do. We were lucky enough today to shut down and listen to two different individual Humpback Whales, Guardian and Ripple. On occasion we have seen these two swimming together, but today Guardian appeared to be resting in calmer waters while Ripple was doing large circles in the powerful current. Both whales fluked consistently, showing their unique tails, exhalations lingering above the currents.

Bald Eagles swooped down to feed in the tide as well. On shore multiple eagle pairs rested in trees, on rocks, and even in a nest. We are hoping that means we’ll get to see eaglets soon. We did spot some young wildlife – Pacific Harbour Seals rested on the tips of a reef still exposed with a pup.

Want to come see things like this for yourself? Book your trip today on our website!

Photo credits to: Stubbs Island Whale Watching, taken by Johanna Ferrie and Alison Ogilvie with a telephoto lens and cropped.

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Surprise!! Fish eating Orca on today’s tour.

The first fish-eating orcas of the season.

The first fish-eating orcas of the season.

Today’s Sightings: Northern Resident Killer Whales (C10, D11 matriline and more), Humpback Whales (Ripple and Black Pearl), Pacific Harbour Seals, Bald Eagles and Rhinoceros Auklets.

Killer whales! There was great excitement on the Lukwa this afternoon as we viewed the first orcas of the season.

Killer whales! There was great excitement on the Lukwa this afternoon as we viewed the first orcas of the season.

The C10 matriline surfaces together.

The C10 matriline surfaces together.

Guests out enjoying the sunshine watching Humpback Whales.

Guests out enjoying the sunshine watching Humpback Whales.

Black Pearl the Humpback Whale feeds in the currents.

Black Pearl the Humpback Whale feeds in the currents.

A big flood tide and sunny conditions added to our already excellent whale watching tour.

A big flood tide and sunny conditions added to our already excellent whale watching tour.

A member of the C10 matriline using the current to move quickly through the area.

A member of the C10 matriline using the current to move quickly through the area.

Pacific Harbour seals sunning themselves on the rocks.

Pacific Harbour seals sunning themselves on the rocks.

Surprise! We got word this morning of Northern Resident (fish-eating) orcas coming our way and caught up with them on our 1pm tour. The C10 matriline traveled quickly using the flood tide to carry them along. At times, they all surfaced together quite close to shore in perfect light. The conditions were magical.

Black Pearl and Ripple the Humpback Whales fed in the strong currents off Blackney Pass. They surfaced often and guests got to see their tails lifting out of the water on numerous occasions. The orcas traveled through the same area and we had a difficult decision to make. Which species do we watch?

Surprise again! On our way back towards Telegraph Cove, we spotted even more orcas. We weren’t sure whether these were fish-eating or mammal-eating originally. Getting some good looks and photos, we were able to identify the D11 matriline of fish-eating orcas, but there were others in the area. We finished today’s tour listening to the exhalations of the year’s first fish-eating orcas as they continued into the distance.

It’s exciting to have fish-eating orcas so early in the season, but it is unlikely that they will stay. We don’t usually have predictable sightings of fish-eating orcas until about mid July. We’ll have to see if these ones stay, but wow, what a day!

Want to come see things like this for yourself? Book your trip today on our website!

All photo credit to Stubbs Island Whale Watching. Photos taken by Johanna Ferrie, Jennie Leaver and Alison Ogilvie with a telephoto lens and cropped.

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More Whale than Usual

one of many tail lons by Conger the Humpback Whale.

One of many tail lobs by Conger the Humpback Whale.

Thursday June 8, 2017 – M.V. Lukwa

Humpback Whales Guardian and Ripple surface simultaneously in a tide rip.

Humpback Whales Guardian and Ripple surface simultaneously in a tide rip.

Guests bundled up in our on-board rain gear admire a lone Pacific Harbour Seal hauled out.

Guests bundled up in our on-board rain gear admire a lone Pacific Harbour Seal hauled out.

The highly distinct fluke, or tail, of Guardian the Humpback Whale.

The highly distinct fluke, or tail, of Guardian the Humpback Whale.

A mature Bald Eagle appears stoic, perched high in the rain.

A mature Bald Eagle appears stoic, perched high in the rain.

What a splash! Such an incredible sight to see Conger's body out of the water.

What a splash! Such an incredible sight to see Conger’s body out of the water.

Today’s trip was highlighted by three Humpback Whales today! Guardian and Ripple were swimming through tide rips together, nearly fluking in tandem, and then we happened upon Conger, who almost seemed to be spending more time in the air than in the water. Multiple tail lobs and breaches allowed us to see more Humpback Whale than we are usually privileged enough to see.  The slaps of Conger’s tail reverberated off the islands.

Steller Sea Lions zipped by in the tide rips too, while the noses of Pacific Harbour Seals could be seen close to shore in calm areas. The high tide meant very few seals were hauled out.

A special treat for the bird watchers was seeing three Harlequin Ducks fly near the boat and many diving birds disappearing beneath the surface.

Quote of the Day:

“Remember, today is the tomorrow you worried about yesterday.”– Dale Carnegie

Want to come see things like this for yourself? Book your trip today on our website!

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Humpback Whale goes missing in Bull Kelp Forest

Can you help find Lucky the Humpback Whale?

Can you help find Lucky the Humpback Whale?

Oh there he/she is! Lucky the Humpback Whale emerges draped in Bull Kelp.

Oh there he/she is! Lucky the Humpback Whale emerges draped in Bull Kelp.

Asleep in a Bull Kelp forest, this Pacific Harbour Seal blended right into it's surroundings.

Asleep in a Bull Kelp forest, this Pacific Harbour Seal blended right into it’s surroundings.

Dall's Porpoise powering through the water. These are the fastest marine mammals in the world and can travel up to 55 km/hr!

Dall’s Porpoise powering through the water. These are the fastest marine mammals in the world and can travel up to 55 km/hr!

Mature Bald Eagle survey's a catch as crows feed opportunistically.

Mature Bald Eagle survey’s a catch as crows feed opportunistically.

Surfacing for air is a Steller Sea Lion.

Surfacing for air is a Steller Sea Lion.

Ripple the Humpback Whale flukes against a mountain backdrop.

Ripple the Humpback Whale flukes against a mountain backdrop.

Wednesday June 5, 2017 – M.V. Lukwa

Today’s Sightings:  Humpback Whales (Ripple, Ojos Blancos, Lucky), Dall’s Porpoises, Steller Sea Lions, Pacific Harbour Seals, Bald Eagles, Rhinoceros Auklets, Common Murres and Pigeon Guillemots.

We had a case of a disappearing Humpback Whale on this afternoon’s trip. Instead of losing the whale on a long dive, this one vanished into a Bull Kelp forest.

We had spotted the Humpback Whale from a distance, but getting closer couldn’t find it. Then out of the Bull Kelp rose Lucky the Humpback Whale. Lucky was draped in so much Bull Kelp we could hardly see the whale! We watched for over 10 minutes as this animal rolled in the kelp, disappearing and returning draped in more of the algae. As Lucky moved forward, the Bull Kelp would slither off, and the whale would submerge again only to return covered once more. We don’t really know why Humpback Whales roll in the Bull Kelp, but it could be just because it feels good. We continued on, leaving Lucky amongst the Bull Kelp slowly surfacing in the shallows.

Other highlights from this afternoon’s trip included bow riding Dall’s Porpoises and a large group of Steller Sea Lions tumbling over one another in the water. Guests also enjoyed watching Ojos Blancos and Ripple the Humpback Whales, and there was great excitement on board whenever their tails rose into the air on a deeper dive.

It was another incredibly action packed day out of Telegraph Cove. Come join us to see if for yourself!

Quote of the Day:

“Age is an issue of mind over matter. If you don’t mind… it doesn’t matter”– Mark Twain

Want to come see things like this for yourself? Book your trip today on our website!

All photo credit to Stubbs Island Whale Watching. Photos taken by Alison Ogilvie with a telephoto lens and cropped.

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Humpback Whale and Bald Eagle feeding frenzy!

Two Humpback Whales surface together in the calm water.

Two Humpback Whales surface together in the calm water.

A mature Bald Eagle perched amongst the lichen.

A mature Bald Eagle perched amongst the lichen.

One, two, three, four Steller Sea Lions hauled out on the rocks today at the eagle's nest.

One, two, three, four Steller Sea Lions hauled out on the rocks today at the eagle’s nest.

A great look at the long whiskers of a Steller Sea Lion.

A great look at the long whiskers of a Steller Sea Lion.

A Bald Eagle with talons full of herring.

A Bald Eagle with talons full of herring.

Welcome back Argoanut! This is Argonaut the Humpback Whale's first sighting of the year.

Welcome back Argoanut! This is Argonaut the Humpback Whale’s first sighting of the year.

Argonaut the Humpback Whale lunge feeds through a school of fish.

Argonaut the Humpback Whale lunge feeds through a school of fish.

Monday June 5, 2017 – M.V. Lukwa

Today’s Sightings:  Humpback Whales (Ripple, Argonaut, Unidentified), Dall’s Porpoises, Steller Sea Lions, Pacific Harbour Seals, Bald Eagles, Rhinoceros Auklets, Common Murres and a Pacific Loon.

What incredible feeding activity we had on this morning’s trip!

The air was very still through the Plumper islands, and as we drifted slowly by, four Steller Sea Lions were hauled out on the rocks. Their low growls broke the silence of this otherwise quiet morning.

Two Humpback Whales rested together, slowly surfacing in the calm waters. We heard another exhalation and were suddenly watching three Humpback Whales! We recognized this third whale as Argonaut and this was his/her first sighting of the year! Welcome back Argonaut!

A large number of Bald Eagles were feeding over a school of fish grabbing talons full of herring. One by one they took turns flying over the area and scooping up their prey. All of a sudden Argonaut the Humpback Whale lunged out of the water engulfing all of the small fish. It was a spectacular sight. Twice more this happened, with all three Humpback Whales eventually joining up, traveling and feeding together.

We had a great morning watching all of the this activity and can’t wait to see what tomorrow might bring.

Quote of the Day:

“A person will sometimes devote all his life to the development of one part of his body – the wishbone” -Robert Frost

Want to come see things like this for yourself? Book your trip today on our website!

All photo credit to Stubbs Island Whale Watching. Photos taken by Alison Ogilvie with a telephoto lens and cropped.

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Dolphins for Days!

A Pacific White-sided Dolphin displaying some aerial acrobatics.

A Pacific White-sided Dolphin displaying some aerial acrobatics.

Sunday June 4, 2017 – M.V. Lukwa

Today’s Sightings:  Humpback Whales (Ojos Blancos, Conger), Minke Whale (Galaxy),

A dolphin surfaces near the Lukwa.

A dolphin surfaces near the Lukwa.

Two mature Bald Eagles perched on a reef.

Two mature Bald Eagles perched on a reef.

A guest getting a closer look at the large group of Pacific White-sided Dolphins moving up Blackfish Sound.

A guest getting a closer look at the large group of Pacific White-sided Dolphins moving up Blackfish Sound.

A male Steller Sea Lion, still wet, lazily waves a pectoral flipper in the sun.

A male Steller Sea Lion, still wet, lazily waves a pectoral flipper in the sun.

More acrobatics! Such a treat to observe.

More acrobatics! Such a treat to observe.

The dorsal fin of this Humpback Whale belongs to Conger, who we saw for the first time this season.

The dorsal fin of this Humpback Whale belongs to Conger, who we saw for the first time this season.

The Coastal Mountains on the Mainland and the Plumper Islands make a stunning backdrop for these hauled-out Pacific Harbour Seals.

The Coastal Mountains on the Mainland and the Plumper Islands make a stunning backdrop for these hauled-out Pacific Harbour Seals.

The Humpback Whale Ojos Blancos (Spanish for White Eyes) dives.

The Humpback Whale Ojos Blancos (Spanish for White Eyes) dives.

Guests were lucky enough to see many different acrobatics from these Dolphins, with Stubbs Island peeking out in the background!

Guests were lucky enough to see many different acrobatics from these Dolphins, with Stubbs Island peeking out in the background!

Pacific White-sided Dolphins, Dall’s Porpoises, Steller Sea Lions, Pacific Harbour Seals, Bald Eagles, Rhinoceros Auklets, Common Murres, and Gulls.

There was so much to see today! One of the highlights was our first sighting of Pacific White-sided Dolphins this season – a group of at least 100 individuals, who were being acrobatic and surface-active. We could hear the slaps and splashes as dolphin after dolphin bellyflopped, backflopped, and breached. Another curved fin appeared as we were watching the dolphins, but larger and darker; it was Galaxy the Minke Whale.

Blows from two different Humpback Whales were also spotted as Ojos Blancos and Conger crossed paths. This was another first for us this season, to see Conger the Humpback back in this area. We were fortunate enough to shut off the engines a few times and hear the difference between the Humpbacks’ and Dolphins’ blows.

On top of all the cetaceans we saw, Pacific Harbour Seals and a single Steller Sea Lion were hauled out and seemed to be enjoying the sun as much as we were, Bald Eagles surveyed us from treetops, and diving birds dotted the water.

Quote of the Day:

You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream…” – C. S. Lewis

Want to come see things like this for yourself? Book your trip today on our website!

All photo credit to Stubbs Island Whale Watching. Photos taken by Johanna Ferrie and Alison Ogilvie with a telephoto lens and cropped.

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