Wonderful Whales

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Thursday, August 9, 2018 – M.V. Sea Legend and M.V. Lukwa

Claw the Humpback Whale arcs his/her back before going down for a deeper dive.

Today’s Sightings: Humpback Whales (Argonaut, Hook, Claw, Pisa, Freckles, Ripple, Obsidian and unidentified), Northern Resident (fish-eating) Orcas (A34 matriline), Pacific White-sided Dolphins, Dall’s Porpoises, Pacific Harbour Seals, Steller Sea Lions, Sea Otter, Bald Eagles, Rhinoceros Auklets, Common Murres, Belted Kingfishers, and Northern Phalaropes.

A wall of fog surrounded Telegraph Cove this early morning, but just beyond the mouth of the cove, blues skies and flat seas awaited us, making for a beautiful day on the water. We ventured out in this incredible area and soon found some Pacific Harbour Seals hauled out in the low tide, sunning themselves, while both juvenile and mature Bald Eagles decorated the tree tops. Several Humpback Whales were seen in the area, and one even became quite active, tail-lobbing and breaching. That Humpback Whale wasn’t the only one making a splash: a group of Steller Sea Lions were seen snacking on a fish, surrounded by seagulls trying to catch some scraps. A small group of Dall’s Porpoises chose to ride the bow of the Lukwa for a moment. Pacific White-sided Dolphins were seen the area, as well as their big cousins, the Orcas! Different matrilines of Fish-eating Orcas filled the area as the day went on, including the A34 matriline. A rarer sighting closed off this wonderful day: a Sea Otter!

A member of the A34 matriline of Fish-eating Orca surfaces in the calm waters of Johnstone Strait.

A55, a member of the A34 matriline of Fish-eating Orcas, is a beautiful example of a mature male. He is 28 year-old!

A beautiful look at the fluke of Hook, a Humpback Whale. The pigmentation and shape of the trailing edge of each Humpback Whale allows us to identify them as individuals,

Watch out! This Steller Sea Lion has his mouth open, and what a mouth! Mature male Steller Sea Lions can be bigger than Grizzly Bears.

A group of Pacific Harbour Seals hauled out in the sun, surrounded by Bull Kelp.

One last look at the Northern Resident (fish-eating) Orcas on our evening tour!

With sunsets like these, how are you not coming out on an evening tour with us !?

Photo credits: Chloe Warren, Ashley Nielsen, and Alex McDonald. All images taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

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