Tuesday September 27, 2016 – MV Lukwa

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

We don’t know who brought the sun with them but we’ll take it. The weather was marvellous today. After days of rain and wind, today was packed with sunshine and wonderfully calm conditions as we ventured out onto the Pacific Ocean.

Alison, our head naturalist calls this her favourite costal region “because of how much you can see in the area just outside Telegraph Cove.” This was evident today as we just broke the mouth of the cove and our first sighting began – Pacific White-sided Dolphins. Then something we didn’t see coming, a Sea Otter poked his/her head out. That was a surprise! None the less we continued on our path towards the dolphins. An exciting way to start the trip as this group chose to ride on the bow and in the wake of the Lukwa. In fact the lighting conditions were so pristine at this moment you could see rainbows in their blows.

The dolphins shortly departed and we went in search of the majestic giant Humpback Whales. If you have been reading our blog lately you’ll know there has been a lot of Humpbacks in our area lately. We were making our way along when the crackle of the radio sounded. Activity! and not far off. We arrived to find five different Humpback Whales all traveling together. Amazing as we watched them fluke one after the other.Our on board naturalist was able to identify all five of these individuals. They are known as Tag, Fern, Domino, Muppet and Merge. We watched as they traveled along together with a group of Steller Sea Lions. Then eventually they began to disperse and we went in search of what else mother nature had in store.

Sea bird activity continues in the area. Not surprising given all the Humpback feeding. With the calm conditions it was a delight to watch good sized rafts of Common Murres. Guests were able to easily make out their distinctive white bellies as they slightly stood up at the surface and flapped their wings. For those of our followers who don’t know, these are the superstars of the diving birds and can go to a depth of a hundred and sixty meters. A delight for bird and whale lovers both, as these birds help drive Herring into tight balls and up to the surface. This can also result in surface feeding amongst Humpback Whales.

Today guests were able to take in the full spectrum of what this area has to offer. We saw Dall’s and Harbour Porpoises, many Pacific Harbour Seals, over a hundred Steller Sea Lions and so much more. Also consistently since May we continue to see Humpback Whales everyday but now in greater numbers than we have seen all season. There were blows in the distance every we looked again today! Only four days left in #spectacularseptember, let the countdown begin! We hope you join us for the last remaining trips of 2016.

Identified Individuals
Humpback Whales: Merge, Muppet, Domino, Tag, Fern, Slash and Ocular (calf), Freckles, Argonaut, Ripple and Corporal.

Other Wildlife
Pacific White-sided Dolphins, Dall’s Porpoise, Harbour Porpoise, Sea Otter, Steller Sea Lions, California Sea Lion, Pacific Harbour Seals, Bald Eagles, Great Blue Heron, Belted Kingfish, Rhinoceros Auklets and Common Murres

Captain Wayne’s Quote of the Day
“No amount of study or learning will make a man a leader unless he has the natural qualities to do so.” – Sir Archibald Wavell.

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Monday September 26, 2016 – MV Lukwa

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

If you ask any of our staff and crew, there is no better way to start your day than on the lively Pacific Ocean and that’s exactly what we did today. We departed Telegraph Cove at 9 a.m. and super excited about what may lay in store. We were pleasantly surprised as always at what we were able to witness.

For the fourth day in a row now we have watched while multiple Humpback Whales actively fed mixed in with hundreds of Pacific White-sided Dolphins, Steller Sea Lions and hundreds of Sea Gulls. Nothing compares to the first day but this is still remarkable to be able to see. In fifty one years on the British Columbia Coast Captain Wayne says, “he has never seen feeding activity like this”. We watched as approximately eight Humpback Whales worked in and around the dolphins. At times we were able see five of these majestic whales all surface at the same time, their blows lingering in the air. This feeding activity went on for over an hour and half. We watched as the whales and dolphins just continued to move from one location to the next, it was mind-blowing.

The Pacific White-sided Dolphins were equally incredible to watch during this event. When fishing Pacific White-sided Dolphins can display some amazing acrobatics. They could be seen leaping feet into the air both as individuals and sometimes even in groups and pairs. What a moment when two of the dolphins leapt up and then inverted towards each other and down towards the surface. Then as if things could not get more amazing, a moment that truly took our breath away; hundreds of dolphins changed course and chose to swim in the direction of the Lukwa. Individuals could be seen both in close and far proximity. Words cannot explain what the eye is able to behold in this instance but it was jaw-dropping and there seemed to be dolphins everywhere.

A calmer but equally exciting moment, the California Sea Lion we have been seeing lately has been the lone California Sea Lion – until today! Now there are two. They are hauling out with a large group of Steller Sea Lions in the area. Speaking of Steller Sea Lions there were more individuals in the water today then there were hauled out. Not unusual for a high tide as there is less rock and thus less room. We often see them in the water and rafting together but today there seemed to be more than we typically see in these rafts, which is always interesting.

Friends of Stubbs, we are sad to say but the countdown is on towards the end of the season. We are shocked at how quickly the time has come and gone. Everyday we depart the cove we are on the edge of our seats. The feeding activity we have been able to witness the last few days tells a true tale of just how rich and alive this area is. Have we told you lately how much we love it here?

Identified Individuals
Humpback Whales: Galaxy, Conger, Ojos Blancos, Ripple, Inukshuk, Ridge, Moonstar, Freckles, Argonaut, Muppet and Twister.

Other Wildlife
Pacific White-sided Dolphins, Steller Sea Lions, California Sea Lion, Pacific Harbour Seals, Bald Eagles, Sooty Shearwaters Rhinoceros Auklets and Common Murres

Captain Wayne’s Quote of the Day
“Animals are such agreeable friends. They ask no questions, they pass no criticisms.” – George Elliot

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Sunday September 25, 2016 – MV Lukwa

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

We’re not going to lie to you friends it was a windy one today but well worth it. With Johnstone Strait roaring and white capped, the first fifteen minutes on board felt a little bit like a roller coaster as we rocked back and forth. Then once we crossed the strait it calmed down quite a bit, pretty typical for a day with a strong South East wind.

The California Sea Lion we spoke of seeing for the first time in awhile is still hanging around today. Guests could see him hauled out with 100’s of Steller Sea Lions. We were alerted to his presence right away from the barking sound mixed in with the typical Steller growl. You can also easily distinguish California Sea Lions from Steller Sea Lions by their size, darker colour and pronounced forehead.

Humpback sightings continue to amp up! Again, we were able to see so many individuals and such interesting behaviours. Slash and her calf Ocular were seen surfacing in tandem. A fascinating moment for guests to be able to see the immense size difference between an adult Humpback and a calf. Speaking of size, guests on board were not quite grasping the unbelievable size of Humpback Whales until one of them breached. Spectacular to see the whale’s huge body as it lunged from the ocean and twisted in the air before flopping back into the water.

Typical for September, feeding activity continues. Jaws dropped on board at being able to see a Humpback Whale trap feeding. This huge whale hanging at the surface with it’s mouth wide open seemed to take people’s breath away. Fascinating that these whales can open their mouths back two thirds of the way down their body. Once again but on a considerably smaller scale than the first time we saw it three days ago, we watched as Humpback Whales fed mixed in amongst Pacific White-sided Dolphins. There had to be at least six Humpbacks and hundreds of dolphins.

After the feeding started to die down, the dolphins swam past the stern of the boat displaying some wonderful acrobatics. They were leaping multiple feet into the air and porpoising as they went along. Not surprising considering Pacific White-sided Dolphins are the most acrobatic dolphins in the world.

Then on our way back to the harbour a quiet and peaceful moment watching Pacific Harbour Seals hauled out and warming themselves on a rocky shoreline. A guest on board asked why some are so much bigger than others? The answer – just like us seals come in different shapes and sizes. It can also be related to feeding and that some Pacific Harbour Seals just happen to eat more than others.

Another wonderful day in the books on the beautiful Pacific! It still never ceases to amaze us how much we are able to see in only three and a half hours. With only six days left this season we are actively working to stay in the moment and look forward to our next excursion tomorrow into the wild blue yonder!

Identified Individuals
Humpback Whales: Lucky, Conger, Cutter Freckles, Moonstar, Domino, Slash and Ocular (calf), Argonaut, Ripple and Ojos Blancos.

Other Wildlife
Pacific White-sided Dolphins, Steller Sea Lions, California Sea Lion, Pacific Harbour Seals, Bald Eagles, Sooty Shearwaters Rhinoceros Auklets and Common Murres

Captain Wayne’s Quote of the Day
“Confidence is the directness and courage in meeting the facts of life.” – John Dewey

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Saturday September 24, 2016 – MV Lukwa

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Super September Saturday is our headline today and what else can we call it, with hundreds of Pacific White-sided Dolphins, the return of the California Sea Lion and continued Humpback activity. Blows everywhere you see as the waters outside Telegraph Cove have been bumping with wildlife.

This morning started off with a bang as came across eight Humpback Whales all feeding in a tide rip. It was Humpbacks everywhere and this continued throughout the day. After watching this group feed for some time we continued on and came across a group of over 300 Pacific White-sided Dolphins. The dolphins were scooting along the the shore and frequently changing directions, quite spectacular to see.

Then in the distance we spotted many blows and all pretty close together. We didn’t know then but we were about to see something our naturalist says she “has never seen in this area before.” A group of five Humpback Whales travelling together, all in a row. In fact they were travelling so close together another vessel on the water mistook them for Orca we found out later on. This group of Humpbacks, five in fact, were identified by our naturalist as Tag, Muppet, Fern, Nippy and Quartz. The incredibleness of this moment was the close proximity of the individuals. Then a moment that took our breath away,  a triple tail fluke as three of the five all went down for a dive in unison. Wow!

As the Humpbacks were traveling a Steller Sea Lion could be seen not to far off. It appeared as if he was checking out what was going on, frequently sticking his head out of the water . Speaking of Steller Sea Lions we had a really interesting sighting of a small group of them as they travelled in Blackfish Sound. The group was seen porpoising out of the water in unison. They continued to travel as if a dolphin would, jumping clear out of the water as they moved forward. Of course they could also be seen hauled out and vocalizing in certain locations as well.

Humpback sightings continued in the afternoon as we watched Inukshuk along with Jigger and her calf Google in close proximity. Interesting watching Inukshuk as of late, as he has been seeing travelling alongside known females on frequent occasions. Inukshuk is a confirmed male by the Marine Education and Research Society, so quite intriguing to see him seeking out females like this. The calf in this instance was also very active as calves tend to be and could be seen tail lobbing and head lobbing. Overall a very fascinating event.

Blows continued in every direction we looked when Captain Wayne and Alison picked up on Pacific White-sided Dolphins and Humpback blows not to far off. So off we went! When we arrived we were shocked to see a mini version of the same feeding frenzy we saw yesterday. With hundreds of Sea Gulls trying to get their share of food from above, while below hundreds of Pacific White-sided Dolphins were swimming in circles with Humpback Whales mixed in with them. Humpback Whales were also seen racing in to try and get their share of the food. Then when it dispersed the dolphins took off like a stamped. You could hear the sound of them ripping through the water. Super cool!

Well, what else can we say but #spectacularseptember continues. There are so many Humpback Whales in the area right now it is astonishing. Literally blows in every direction we look. Add to that, the frequent dolphin sightings of late and in large groups and a profusion of Steller Sea Lions. We are dumbfounded with the amount of activity going on. With only 6 days left in the season we are holding our breath as to what might happen next.

Identified Individuals
Humpback Whales: Lucky, Conger, Freckles, Moonstar, Cutter, Domino, Tag, Nippy, Fern, Muppet, Quartz, Inukshuk with a Mom and calf pair. Maude and Linea

Other Wildlife
Pacific White-sided Dolphins, Steller Sea Lions, California Sea Lion Dall’s Porpoise Pacific Harbour Seals, Bald Eagles, Sooty Shearwaters Rhinoceros Auklets and Common Murres

Captain Wayne’s Quote of the Day
“Nobody’s problem is ideal. Nobody has things just as he would like them.” – Dr. Frank Crane

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Friday September 23, 2016 – MV Lukwa

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

When it came to weather today our morning and afternoon trips were like night and day. Pouring rain in the morning and then a warm sunny afternoon. Regardless, they had many other things in common. The main two being, Humpback activity, lots of it and both trips had a wonderful sighting of approximately 500 Pacific White-sided Dolphins. As Captain Wayne said today, “even after 20 years, September still continues to amaze me.”

This morning we hosted local primary school students from the Quatsino K’ak’ot’lats’i School. The kids were eager, braving the rain, pointing out Humpback Whales and curiously asking their names. We had incredible Humpback sightings in the morning, filled with breaches, lunge feeding, tail lobbing and fascinating trumpeting. We watched as Inukshuk breached, tail lobbed and then was seen swimming side by side with another Humpback. Such interesting trumpeting from the two whales as one was higher pitched and another very low. We’re not sure if this was a race for fish or not but the two whales were pointed in the same direction and then one took a huge lunge feed.

As we traveled back to Telegraph Cove the rain started to lighten up when we came across a large group of Pacific White-sided Dolphins. There was dolphins everywhere the eye could see, choosing to ride on the bow and in the wake and spread out over miles in the distance. The kids were able to see them jumping and displaying some impressive acrobatics.

The afternoon was what can only be described as a once in a lifetime sighting. We were travelling in the direction of an area known for Humpback activity when we came across the same large group of Pacific White-sided Dolphins from the morning. They were traveling swiftly and in the direction of the some pretty major bird activity. Then everything started going off and we were witness to the most amazing and huge feeding frenzy you can imagine. The amount of small fish that had to be present for this to occur is mind blowing. We watched as over 500 dolphins, multiple Steller Sea Lions, diving birds, Sea Gulls and approximately 7 Humpback Whales fed for over 45 minutes. Mind blowing is the best word that comes to mind when taking in this fantastic sighting.

With the hydrophone in guests were able to watch this incredible display of nature and listen to dolphin vocalizations and Humpback Whale sounds. Meanwhile at the surface it was lunge feed after lunge feed, mixed in with porpoising dolphins and Steller Sea Lions. Food for everyone seemed to be what was happening. There was trumpeting from the Humpbacks and hundreds of Sea Gulls feeding from above. Talk about jaw dropping! We took a video to help give an idea of that this was like and it will be available in the near future. To give you an idea of how rare this is Captain Wayne has with Stubbs Island Whale Watching for 20 years and working on the water for more than 30 years before that with the RCMP and he said today, “he has never seen anything like that!”

Sometimes folks, you just get lucky and today was one of those days. The power of nature has taken us by storm many times this season but today it ripped through us like a tornado.

Identified Individuals
Humpback Whales: Squiggle, Ridge, Merge, Maude and Linea (calf), Inukshuk, Jigger and Google(calf), Twister, Fern, Ojos Blancos, Argonaut, Slash and Occular (calf), Lucky, Conger, Moonstar and Ripple

Other Wildlife
Pacific White-sided Dolphins, Steller Sea Lions, Pacific Harbour Seals, Bald Eagles, Blue Heron, Sooty Shearwaters Rhinoceros Auklets and Common Murres

Captain Wayne’s Quote of the Day
“There is no physician like a true friend” – Anon

Posted in Captain's Log | Leave a comment

Thursday September 22, 2016 – MV Lukwa

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Roger McDonell. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Roger McDonell. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Roger McDonell. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Roger McDonell. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Everyday in our pre-boarding talk Captain Wayne can be heard speaking about his past. He has been “in almost every nook and cranny on the British Columbia coast.” Then he continues on – “but the 40 mile radius just outside of Telegraph Cove is the jewel.” Today our guests from across the globe found out just how true this is.

Humpback activity continues to mount throughout September. Today there were blows in every direction. They could be seen as close as 100 meters and as far as miles away. Just amazing to see so many Humpback Whales. Especially considering they were aggressively whaled until 1967; almost to the point of extinction. Today saw up to 15 or more individuals in one geographical area.

Both on the morning and afternoon tour we had breaching,tail-lobbing and feeding activity. These majestic giants can take your breath away just with their blows and beautiful tail flukes but to see them active is truly spectacular. After one of the breaches, there were four or five Humpbacks all within eyesight and close proximity that then surfaced. It was a fantastic sight. Then as we pulled away Lucky the Humpback Whale started and continued to tail lob for many minutes after.

As we were attempting to make our return to Telegraph Cove this afternoon we continued to have Humpback sightings along the way. For our safety and the safety of the whales we made sure to travel slow. In line with the Marine Education and Research Society’s campaign “See a Blow Go Slow.” Then suddenly an incredible sighting of Pacific White-sided Dolphins. Over 500 of them! They were choosing to ride along in the wake of the boat and could be seen both close and far off into the distance. In fact there were times when they were rolling over as they traveled together and you could see their underbellies. It was a very captivating experience.

Pacific Harbour Seals were hauled out everywhere we went today it seemed. We saw them in various locations warming themselves on the rocky shores and swimming along in the water. Speaking of haul outs the Steller Sea Lions were swimming in the water and hauled out today. There were a few who were porpoising out of the water. Quite a sighting to see how acrobatic these huge sea lions can be.

We also saw a Steller Sea Lion fishing at the surface. When eating they typically break the surface with a fish in their mouth and then rip it apart by flinging it around at the surface. We watched as this sea lion continued to rip apart the fish until he eventually swallowed it. After he finished the Sea Gulls could be seen swooping from above to pick up the scraps.

No wonder Captain Wayne calls this the jewel of the British Columbia Coast. It is wild out there in every way that wild can be. Whether you are talking about growing in a natural environment, not domesticated or cultivated, or to be uncontrolled and unrestrained. This area is most definitely wild, beautiful and last but not least, as we witnessed today, full of life.

Identified Individuals
Humpback Whales: Maude and calf, Moonstar, Squiggle, Lucky, Conger.

Other Wildlife
Pacific White-sided Dolphins, Steller Sea Lions, Pacific Harbour Seals, Bald Eagles, Blue Heron, Sooty Shearwaters Rhinoceros Auklets and Common Murres

Captain Wayne’s Quote of the Day
“I am somebody, I am me. I like being me and I need nobody to make me somebody.” – Louis L’Amour

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Wednesday September 21, 2016 – MV Lukwa

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Humpback Whales were out in full force today and reports of them came flooding in immediately after we left Telegraph Cove. Guests were prepped and ready to go, knowing to keep an eye out for birds when we are looking for these giants of the ocean.

There were seven whales that our naturalist was able to identify but there was many more that we were unable to identify. We took a lot of pictures and will be working on pinpointing who these whales are over the next few days. All information we collect is forwarded to the Marine Education and Research Society.

The first Humpback Whale that we came across was Guardian. Guardian was travelling along quite slowly and likely resting. This was a beautiful sighting because of the calm conditions and Guardian’s beautiful all white tail. As we watched her surface, her blows lingered in the air and the lighting was just beautiful and allowed for spectacular photo opportunities. As we continued to watch Guardian, she suddenly surprised guests and crew alike when she breached. Always breath taking when these giants lunge out of the ocean.

As we continued on our way the Humpback sightings continued. Stopped and drifting at one point we were surrounded. We watched lunge feeds in front of us and off in the distance. These giants are feeding right now as much as possible before they begin the long migration back to Hawaii or Mexico. Another great Humpback moment as we watched a mom and calf pair. This mom is the biggest Humpback recorded by NOAA, something they revealed to us at their presentation in mid August. Maude is 14.7 meters long or 48.3 feet and this is her third known calf. We can’t possibly do justice to the amount of Humpback activity that was out there today.

As we traveled through the Plumper Island passages, guests on board seemed to really enjoy the silence and crystal green water as we shut of the engines and just drifted through. There was lots of Pacific Harbour Seals in the passages today swimming in and around the Bull Kelp. In the trees above we were able to see two different Bald Eagles. Always such beautiful and serene moments in these small passages.

Then just when we were about to head back the unexpected happen – a fantastic look at a Minke Whale. In fact, this is one of our best Minke sightings all season. Typically with Minke Whales it is kind of like, “ now you see me, now you don’t” but today guests were able to make out the rostrum, blowhole and the dorsal as the whale was traveling quite slowly and the conditions were super calm. Thank to you to Ali from Kingfisher Kayaks for the report.

It is easy to see from the last few days and weeks why our head Naturalist Alison calls September her favourite month out here and why we have named it #spectacularseptember. You can come prepared for the chilly weather but we can never prepare ourselves for how astonishing the wildlife can be.

Identified Individuals
Humpback Whales: Guardian, Moonstar, Maude and calf, Squiggle, Freckles, BCYuk2016#12 plus many more unidentified
Minke Whale: Eclipse

Other Wildlife
Dall’s Porpoise, Steller Sea Lions, Pacific Harbour Seals, Black-tailed Deer, Bald Eagles,Cassin’s Auklets, Blue Heron, Sooty Shearwaters Rhinoceros Auklets and Common Murres

Captain Wayne’s Quote of the Day
”Let him who has enough wish for nothing more” – Horace

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Tuesday September 20, 2016 – MV Lukwa

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

A cloudy and grey morning gave way to a sunny afternoon today and it was wonderful to be out for the second day in a row without rain.

This morning we hosted a local school group from Wagalus School in Fort Rupert. The kids on board were quite young but had many moments where they were clearly engaged in what they were seeing. Many of them could be heard and seen pointing out the whales and imploring great quiet around the noise sensitive Steller Sea Lions and Pacific Harbour Seals.

We watched as three or four Humpbacks fed in a tide rip. Guardian the Humpback Whale was displaying some interesting behaviour as her rostrum came out of the water and lingered at the surface. At other times her rostrum was the first part of her out of the water and then she quickly rounded and submerged again in an almost porpoising like behaviour. It was a very engaging moment as these Humpbacks worked their way in and around each other, likely feeding on fish not far below the surface.

In the afternoon and the morning, guests were lucky to catch up with a large group of Northern Resident Orcas. The whales were foraging on fish and working their way to the west. Amazing to watch as they wiggled at the surface and actively dove after Salmon that were in the area. Rounding out this experience were incredible vocals. There vocals were arguably some of the best we have heard all season as we listened to G Clan calls. They have the distinct call that sounds a lot like a donkey,
“eee-aw”.

In the afternoon, the atmosphere was fascinating as the sky seemed almost divided by the lifting fog in Queen Charolotte Strait. Completely grey and sliver on one side of the boat and sunny and blue on the other. This created an absolutely stunning environment for photos. The whales continued their way west as we watched them continue to forage and work their way out into the open ocean. These last three sightings of the Northern Residents have been absolutely captivating based on the sheer number of whales and the added fact that some of these matrilines are not seen in our are very often.

As we returned back to the harbour at the end of the day, Dall’s Porpoise chose to ride along side the boat. Shortly after the porpoises moved on we could hear the vocalizations of Steller Sea Lions as we passed by one of their haul outs. Then on the final leg of our journey back to Telegraph Cove, guests could be seen enjoying the warm sun and posing for pictures. It was apparent they were enjoying the moment.

With the beautiful conditions upon our return we are looking forward to a beautiful sunset in Telegraph Cove tonight.  We were very fortunate today to have beautiful sightings, an abundance of whales and other wildlife. We honestly can’t ask for more.

Now we wait and see what tomorrow will bring.

Identified Species
Northern Resident Orca: A30s, A25s, A23s, I33s, I68s, G3s, G16s G31s
Humpback Whales: Guardian, Moonstar, Argonaut, Freckles and Quartz

Other Wildlife
Pacific White-sided Dolphins, Dall’s Porpoise, Steller Sea Lions, Bald Eagles, Rhinoceros Auklets, Pelagic Cormorants and Common Murres

Captain Wayne’s Quote of the Day
”Forgiveness is the highest and most difficult of all moral lessons.” -Joseph Jacobs

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Monday September 19, 2016 PM Trip – MV Lukwa

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Today the marvel of Mother Nature astounded us, left us at a loss for words and inspired a feeling of gratitude and introspection.

Just as we do everyday we boarded the lovely Lukwa for her tours. We welcomed a variety of guests from across the globe, played our standard safety announcement and departed into the wild blue yonder. Conditions were enchanting as the sun began to break through the clouds and we saw the first blue sky we have had in days. The ocean was still, reflective and like a layer of silk. Every ripple could be seen and every blow, whether from Humpback or Orca they were visible from miles away. It was truly spectacular out there.

We began our journey with a visit to a local Steller Sea Lion haul out. The sea lions could be heard vocalizing from far away. There were hundreds of them hauled out and drying themselves off in the warm September sun. As we were observing the sea lions the powerful exhalation of a Humpback Whale sounded just behind us. Argonaut the Humpback Whale surfaced to breathe a few times, creating ripples in the calm water and then fluked displaying his/her massive and distinct tail.

In the wheelhouse Captain Wayne was at work navigating the boat north. Directly in front of us we could see Humpback blows in the area we were headed. Then the radio began to crackle and ignite with reports of Northern Resident Orca. Jared Towers from the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) was relaying a sighting of a large group of multiple matrilines traveling in from the west and into our range. What was to be unveiled over the next hour was a truly special sighting and evidence as to why Michael Biggs chose this area when he began his world changing research years ago.

Through this season we have had many amazing days but until today we have not seen this many matrilines travelling together in our area. Guests were able to watch as over 50+ Killer Whales and 8 matrilines worked their way in from the west. It was heart pounding to watch as they surfaced in proximity to one another, their exhalations echoing over the water. They also engaged in social behaviours with one another, tail lobbing and logging at the surface as they appeared to waiting for one another. There was also the occasional spy-hop and rolling over along with pectoral fin slapping. So amazing to see how social and intelligent these whales are. This encounter was a moment to remember.

As we lay our heads down to sleep tonight we will see the calm surface of the Pacific Ocean, the blows of Humpback Whales and Orca lingering in the air and hear the sounds of their exhalations echoing in the distance. What a captivating and memorable day.

Identified Species
Transient (Bigg’s) Orca: T69s and T90s
Northern Resident Orca: A30s, A25s, A23s, I33s, I68s, G3s, G16s G31s and possible more.
Humpback Whales: Arognaut, Inukshuk, Guardian, Domino and 2 to 4 more unidentified

Other Wildlife
Pacific White-sided Dolphins, Dall’s Porpoise, Pacific Harbour Seals, Steller Sea Lions, Bald Eagles Rhinoceros Auklets and Common Murres

Captain Wayne’s Quote of the Day
”True freedom lies in the realization and calm acceptance of the fact there may very well be no perfect answer.” – Allen R. McGinnis

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Sunday September 18, 2016 – MV Lukwa

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Despite the gloomy sky we were excited to get out of the harbour, as reports had come in that the Northern Residents (Orca) had returned to our area and would be within our range shortly. This was very promising news. Time to get going!

As we arrived just a few miles west of the Robson Bight Ecological Reserve two families of Northern Resident Orca were working their way along the Vancouver Island Shoreline. The first thing we noticed after spotting them was that these whales were literally surrounded by Pacific White-sided Dolphins. In fact these dolphins were so persistent it was mind blowing to watch. At times you could see the dolphins diving in toward each other, knowing an Orca was just below them. Then, the loud exhale at the surface as an Orca came up to breathe along with about 15 dolphins surrounding it. It was quite a stunning site to see.

Before we pulled away, guests could still make out Killer Whales in the distance. We watched as the dolphins then once more took off in their direction. The dolphins were quite acrobatic as they moved about from one group of whales to the other. Often they could be seen jumping right out of the water. Just super!

Time was flying by, so after spending a good amount of time with the dolphins and Killer Whales we went off to see what else was out there. We traveled back down Johnstone Strait in the direction of Telegraph Cove. Low and behold off in the distance, a Humpback blow. We arrived to watch Argonaut as he/she surfaced in conditions that were just mind blowing. The surface of the Pacific Ocean looked like silk and as Argonaut came up to breath his/her blows lingered in the air. The conditions made for wonderful photographic moments.

To round out the day we visited a local Steller Sea Lion haul out. Since the tide was high only the large males were sighting out on the rock. Interesting to watch the rest of the sea lions as they swam about in the water. Different members of the group could be seen with their pectoral flippers hanging out of the water, as well as porpoising and rolling over one another. All the while, the sound of their growl rang through the air. Then, just as we pulled away it really started to rain. Perfect timing as we were just about to start the trip back home.

The amount of wildlife and the diversity of species we can see, just a few short miles from the cove, can be mind blowing; even for the crew after hundreds of trips this season. It is a true adventure to come on board the Lukwa and venture out into this incredible area. With only 13 days left this season we are enjoying every moment. If you haven’t booked your trip yet, now is the time. Join us as #spectacularseptember continues.

Identified Species
Northern Resident Orca: A30s and I15s
Humpback Whales: Argonaut

Other Wildlife
Pacific White-sided Dolphins, Steller Sea Lions, Bald Eagles, Black Oystercatchers, Rhinoceros Auklets and Common Murres

Captain Wayne’s Quote of the Day
“In all climates, under all skies, man’s happiness is always somewhere else.” -Giacomo Leopardi

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