Thursday May 26, 2016 – MV Lukwa

Photo Credit: Alison Ogilive. Image taken with telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo Credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo Credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo Credit: Alison Ogilvie.

Photo Credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Mother Nature provided us with another day of exceptional weather. An overcast morning and a bit cold, the clouds cleared and the sun broke through just an hour or so prior to our departure from Telegraph Cove. The combination of sun and wind made for gorgeous conditions, especially as we traveled through Blackney Pass. With tidal currents in this area, guests were privilege to a brilliant blue colour as the Lukwa drifted through.

Characteristic for this time of year the Humpback Whales we encountered went down for long dives, feeding at depth. Feeding is typically the focus for these whales at this time of year, having just returned from their long migratory route to either Mexico or Hawaii. Of the 3 humpbacks in Blackney Pass on board naturalist, was only able to ID locally known Ripple. Confirmed by MERS research and named for the rippled features on her tail. Contrasting these long dive patterns was Ojos Blancos (White Eyes in Spanish), surfacing and fluking often. He/She took shorter dives, lasting around five minutes, which made for excellent viewing.

Never disappointing, the Steller Sea Lions, all sunny and warm were resting on the rocks. With some mature individuals lounging, it was the juveniles who stole the guest’s attention today. Grouped together in the same spot and resting their heads on one another’s bodies in a pattern humans would relate or refer to as cuddling. They were difficult to turn away from.

Another excellent day on the water with guests from across the globe and the beauty of mother nature. So far the 2016 season is off to a very positive start and everyday the excitement grows.

Individuals Identified
Humpback Whales: Ojos Blancos and Ripple

Other Wildlife Included
-Steller Sea Lions, 2  unknown Humpback Whales.
-Bald Eagles

Captain Wayne’s Quote of the Day

“You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough.” – Mae West

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Wednesday May 25, 2016 – MV Lukwa

Photo Credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Another beautiful day on the waters of Johnstone Strait. Guests were engaging and curious, getting involved in deep conversations with Alison our onboard Naturalist in regards to animal behaviours and patterns. With the sun beaming down and the abundance of fresh air it was a delight to be on the water.

Photo Credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Known to weigh more than a Grizzly Bear, the sea lions can be quite awe-inspiring. Their size was made exceptionally evident as some mature sea lions were seen posturing. The group was exceptionally vocal and seen laid out at one of their favourite spots on the rocks in Weynton Pass.

Photo Credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo Credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo Credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo Credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Now flourishing and regularly seen on our tours, it is hard to believe that these magnificent birds were once endangered. Today eagles were soaring above the crystal blue water and heard communicating with one another as the Lukwa passed by.

The real privilege of the day, was encountering five different Humpback Whales.   As of late we have consistently come across Ojos Blancos (White Eyes in Spanish) and today was no different. Shortly after we left Ojos Blancos seeing his/her almost all black tail, a guest spotted a blow off the left side of the boat. It was Inukshuk the Humpback Whale! Almost immediately, the whale fluked, displaying his/her distinct white tail. Seeing these two very distinct whales tails in such a short time demonstrated to guests the variety that is present in Humpback Whale flukes and helped illustrate why Humpback Whale flukes are such a key component in the identification process.

The high point of today’s excursion was when we came across three Humpback Whales in the same area. Initially together they soon split into different directions surfacing to the left, right and front of the boat.  Scrambling in different directions guests worked to take it all in. Comparing these photos to the Marine Education and Research Society’s catalogue, we identified the three whales as KC, Ripple and Ridge known to return to these waters year after year. Also confirmed by MERS, KC has been returning to this area since he/she was first spotted as a calf with his/her mother Houdini back in (2002).

Another spectacular day sharing the waters of Northern Johnstone Strait with a variety of whales, marine mammals and birds.
 

Individuals Identified
Humpback Whales: Ojos Blancos, Inukshuk, Ripple, Ridge and KC

Other Wildlife Included:
Steller Sea Lions
Bald Eagles and Pelagic Cormorant

Captain Wayne’s Quote of the Day
“What shall it be, bankruptcy of purse or bankruptcy of life” – Sterling Haypen

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Monday May 23, 2016 – MV Lukwa

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

A wonderful day on the water with a mix of wildlife, energetic guests and the ever temperate climate of the BC Coast.

An uncommon sighting today as we had a brief encounter with an elusive Minke Whale. Known for being a bit mysterious, guests were privilege to a few brief dorsal fin surfaces. This allowed on board Naturalist Alison Ogilvie, to confidently say that it was indeed a Minke. Known to these waters but not often seen on our trips.

Classic west coast weather created a bit of chop on the water and brought some clean crispness to the air. It was delightful to pass an eagle’s nest on our journey today with an eagle perched above and another sitting in the nest. We also watched as an eagle soared just above the water. Always a graceful and dynamic experience.

Continuing to make appearances on our trips is the humpback, Ojos Blancos. He/She was seen today fluking and swimming in the tide rips along with Ripple another Humpback Whale. The Marine Education and Research Society (MERS) has just confirmed that this is Ripple’s first sighting in the area this year! Ripple was first sighted in this area, already adult sized in 2005. She has consistently been returning to this area, with regular sightings every year but 2008. We also know that Ripple is female since she has brought calves to this area in 2012 and 2014. We were extra lucky to cross paths with a third humpback, local favourite Inukshuk. He/She was active today, fluking and tail lobbing while leaving big splashes in his/her wake.

Lounging on the rocks, as we typically find them in Weynton Pass was a group of Steller Sea Lions. There were a few swimming in the waters nearby but most were laid out on the rocks and looking quite dry. The size of these sea lions is always incredible to witness.

A wonderful second trip of the season with enthusiastic guests on board. Everyday we spend on and around the waters of Johnstone Strait is an adventure. We never know from one day to the next what might happen. Just one of the beauties of operating out of historic Telegraph Cove. To all the guests on today’s boat thank you for joining us and we look forward to an exciting season ahead.

Individuals Identified
Humpback Whales: Ojos Blancos, Ripple and Inukshuk

Other Wildlife Included:
Minke Whale, Steller Sea Lions, Dall’s Porpoises
Bald Eagles, Rhinoceros Auklet, Marbled Murrelet, Pelagic Cormorant

Captain Geoff’s Quote of the Day

“Don’t take life to seriously. You will never get out alive” – Elbert Hubbard

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Saturday, May 21, 2016 – MV Lukwa

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jennie Leaver. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

It was a spectacular day to be out on the water! The sun was out as we traveled on glassy calm waters. The air was clear and crisp and we were very fortunate to encounter three humpbacks on our journey today. The first Humpback Whale we came across today dove and did not resurface after the initial sighting. We were very excited to encounter Ojos Blancos and Quartz who have returned to these waters once again. From contributing to the Marine Education and Research Society (MERS) we know that these humpbacks have both only been spotted in the area for the first time yesterday.

Sunning themselves on the rocks were a group of six to eight Steller Sea Lions.  They looked warm and dry, while a full grown male postured on the rocks. Meanwhile in the waters nearby there was a another group swimming playfully.

The birds were also spectacular today. We were lucky to come upon a beautiful pair of full grown bald eagles resting in a tree top. The two sat perfectly perched and then in unison spread their wings, practically touching and flew away into the horizon. In addition to eagles, we watched as White-winged Scoters flew along the water just a few feet from the surface.

It was a pleasure to start the 2016 season off on such a beautiful sunny day, with a boat full of guests ranging from locations across the globe, Ontario to Germany. Looking forward to another great season, filled with smiles, wonderful wildlife and the beauty of everything the British Columbia coast has to offer.

Individuals Identified
Humpback Whales: Ojos Blancos and Quartz

Other Wildlife Included:
Steller Sea Lions, Pacific Harbour Seals, and Dall’s Porpoises
Bald Eagles, White-winged Scoters and Harlequin Ducks

Captain Wayne’s Quote of the Day

“Don’t worry, be happy.” – Bob Marley

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Counting Down…4 Days to Go

The dream of seeing whales in the wild can come true in Telegraph Cove. Listed in the book  ‘1000 Places To See Before You Die’, Stubbs Island Whale Watching offers guests an experience in the wild the can only be described as remarkable.

Counting down the last four days until the start of this year’s season, our office is bubbling over with excitement. Reports are coming in of Humpback whales returning to the area including a couple of favourites. Argonaut was sighted yesterday May 18th and the distinctive ‘A’ on his tail fluke was confirmation for the Marine Research and Education Society (MERS) that this was in fact its earliest return on record. Also sighted was another regular to the area, Inukshuk. These two frequently hang out in Weynton Passage and Blackfish Sound feeding throughout the summer.

While the humpback populations begin their annual return, our staff are also migrating back to Telegraph Cove. The ‘M.V. Lukwa’ has been prepped and looks anxious to head out on its first tour on Monday, May 23rd. Captains Geoff Dunstan and Wayne Garton along with Head Naturalist Alison Ogilvie have been working to make sure that she is in tip top shape for the season.

Meanwhile the office staff have been answering phones as they stock the gift shop with exciting new items along with the regular favourites found on our shelves. Everything from whale themed coffee mugs to warm, snuggly hoodies are carefully laid out throughout the store so you can find that special gift for those back home.

Our team are overflowing with anticipation while they wait for guests to arrive so we can all get out on the water. You wouldn’t know it looking at the quiet boardwalk that in a few days the Cove will fill with people coming from all around the world each seeking out their own remarkable experience.

As the hummingbirds buzz around the feeders that hang from the cabins along the boardwalk, we see the spring showers as a sure sign that summer is mere moments away. Telegraph Cove will soon be transformed once again from quiet and quaint West Coast community to bustling with the energy of visitors and wildlife.

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Saturday, October 3, 2015 – MV Lukwa – Last Day!!

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Amazing morning and afternoon for our last day! Humpbacks travelling in triples! There were three occurrences of three humpbacks travelling together. In the morning the air was still and all three blows from the first group of three hung in the air; it was Merge, Argonaut and Ripple. They all fluked, Ripple breached, and then breached again and tail lobbed a few times. The second group of three was Pultney travelling with 2 “new” Humpbacks (never seen before in this area, as confirmed by the marine education and research society!) Exciting news! The final trio of humpbacks appeared during the afternoon; it was Domino, Slits and Freckles moving along together and fluking.

In the morning we were also fortunate enough to see three families of Fish-eating Orcas. All three families were part of the G-Clan: G16, G22 and G31 matrilines. They were by the Enfolds and quite spread out. We got to witness some juveniles playing with salmon at the surface and were even lucky enough to hear some vocals! A wonderful addition to a calm morning.

We also got to see Pacific Harbour Seals and Steller Sea Lions hauled out, showing just how big sea lions really are. There were lots of different birds soaring overhead as well. And to top it all off, we got to show off this wonderful area and these spectacles to a high-school group from Langley!

It’s hard to believe that the season is over, but it has been a pleasure to see so many people from so many different places and share each great trip. We here at Stubbs hope that everyone has a pleasant winter, wherever you may be, and we look forwards to seeing you next year for the 2016 season!!

Individuals Identified
Fish-Eating Orca (Northern Residents): G15, G31 and G22 Matrilines
Humpback Whales: Merge, Argonaut, Ripple, Pultney, Domino, Freckles, Slits, Ojos Blancos, Quartz, and two Unknown Whales.

Other Wildlife Included:
Steller Sea Lions, Pacific Harbour Seals, and Dall’s Porpoises
Pelagic Cormorants, Western Grebes, Sooty Shearwaters, Bald Eagles, Rhinoceros Auklets, Common Murres, Belted Kingfishers, Surf Scoters, Black Scoters, and White-winged Scoters.
Captain Wayne’s Quote of the Day:
The 2015 season for whale watching here in historic Telegraph Cove comes to a close after a fabulous summer of Whales! And Weather! Cap’n Wayne wishes to thank visitors from NEAR and FAR and NEXT YEAR??
“The future is the shape of things to come.” – H.G. Wells

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Friday, October 2, 2015 – MV Lukwa

Photo credit: Jackie Hildering. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jackie Hildering. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jackie Hildering. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jackie Hildering.

Photo credit: Jackie Hildering. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Jackie Hildering.

Photo credit: Jackie Hildering.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie.

Blustery and beautiful! Today, we had gusts of wind which added to the adventure AND the activity. Some Humpbacks seem to be especially acrobatic when it’s windy. The waves moving over them appears to be a trigger. Such was the case with Conger this morning, he/she breached again, and again, and again in amongst the waves. It was spectacular to witness and we were so glad that this happened while local school children from Fort Rupert Elementary were aboard. We also watched Conger’s huge pectoral fins slap the surface of the water. Guardian the Humpback was also active in the waves, tail slapping while Cutter was very near.
The blustery bliss continued into the afternoon. This time it was Ridge the Humpback Whale who was so active. Ridge slapped his/her tail on the water several times in the sheltered waters of Blackney Pass before moving into a more blustery section of water and breaching completely out of the water! Having previously only observed Ridge’s back and dorsal fin, guests now fully understood how large Humpback Whales really are. Huge splashes could be seen across Blackfish Sound all afternoon as Humpbacks continued to leap out of water. Humpback Whale ballet, it really is the best!
Among the waves, we spotted some taller, blacker dorsal fins. Some of the fish-eating orcas had returned! Although the Chinook Salmon have now run up the rivers, this group of Orcas has likely returned to the area to feed on Chum Salmon. Chinook Salmon is the preferred prey of these Orcas, but Chum Salmon is also an important part of the Orca’s diet at certain times of the year. These Orcas were also very active in the waves. They surfed, charged and pushed one another around, while constantly changing directions. As exciting as these Orcas were, some guests chose to watch the Humpback Whale lunge feeding frenzy taking place on the other side of the boat. If only we could have torn ourselves in two, there was just so much going on.
It really was just that kind of day: wild, windy and wonderful!!

Individuals Identified
Fish-Eating Orca (Northern Residents): G15 and G22 Matrilines
Humpback Whales: Guardian, Conger, Domino, Cutter, Ridge, Freckles and Frosty.

Captain Wayne’s Quote of the Day
“All things come to him who waits, provided he knows what he is waiting for” -Woodrow Wilson
Other Wildlife Included:
Steller Sea Lions and Pacific Harbour Seals
Pelagic Cormorants, Western Grebes, Sooty Shearwaters, Bald Eagles, Rhinoceros Auklets, Common Murres, Belted Kingfishers, Great Blue Herons, and White-winged Scoters.
Next Available Tours:
Saturday October 3 @ 1:00 pm

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Thursday, October 1, 2015 – MV Lukwa

Photo credit: Johanna Ferrie. Taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Johanna Ferrie. Taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Johanna Ferrie.

Photo credit: Johanna Ferrie. Taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Johanna Ferrie. Taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Johanna Ferrie.

Photo credit: Johanna Ferrie. Taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Johanna Ferrie. Taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Johanna Ferrie. Taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Today’s trip was one for the birders! We got to witness a rich variety of some of the avian life in this area, starting with a Common Merganser and a Great Blue Heron as we left the Cove.  Common Murres were abundant as we made our way down Johnstone Strait, some displaying breeding plumage and most displaying non-breeding plumage. Different kinds of Seagulls circled overhead and mature Bald-headed Eagles were perched in trees intermittently along Hanson Island. As we moved towards Blackney Pass, Belted Kingfishers darted in front of the boat, landing on branches briefly before flying away. Definitely a challenge to photograph!

Once we entered Blackney Pass, the harsh exhalations of Steller Sea Lions and the blow of a Humpback Whale were audible. Many sea lions were in the water, splashing and interacting with one another. Despite the high tide, quite a few sea lions managed to haul out on the rocks. However, there was lots of growling and one male grabbed another male by his throat! The Humpback Whale that we could hear turned out to be Guardian. She moved quickly towards Cracroft Point where the waters were almost flat calm, a temporary state that would soon be changed into rapids once the tide started ebbing.

As we ventured to Blackfish Sound, more Humpback blows could be seen. We also got a surprise “bird sighting”; there was a Grumman Goose on a barge! Cap’n Wayne eventually explained that it was actually the little plane on the barge, an 8-seater amphibious aircraft. Other “real” birds flew overhead as well, including Pelagic Cormorants, Sooty Shearwaters, and two White-winged Scoters.

Bird activity began to increase as the tide began moving and we saw lots of activity in Weynton Pass. Argonaut the Humpback Whale was feeding in the area, as well as Steller Sea Lions. As we prepared to return to Telegraph Cove, two more big blows caught our attention; two more Humpbacks – Slits and Cutter – were circling. Watching Slits show his tail for a deeper dive was a lovely way to finish off a delightful afternoon.

Individuals Identified:
Humpback Whales: Guardian, Merge, Ripple, Argonaut, Slits, Cutter.

Captain Wayne’s Quote of the Day:
“Experience is not what happens to you; it is what you DO with what happens to you.”
- Aldous Huxley

Other Wildlife Included:
Steller Sea Lions, Pacific Harbour Seals, and Dall’s Porpoises.
Grumman Goose, Common Merganser, Pelagic Cormorants, Western Grebes, Sooty Shearwaters, Bald Eagles, Rhinoceros Auklets, Common Murres, Belted Kingfishers, Great Blue Herons, and White-winged Scoters.

Next Available Tours (only two left!!):
Friday October 2 @ 1:00 pm
Saturday October 3 @ 1:00 pm
Reservations Required
1-800-665-3066
www.stubbs-island.com

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Wednesday, September 30, 2015 – MV Lukwa

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie.

Today was all about Steller Sea Lions and Humpback Whales. As the fog cleared over Blackney Pass the small puffs of Steller Sea Lions dotted the horizon as the larger exhalations of Humpback Whales rose in the distance. The flood tide was creating a lot of activity, gathering the food together for the Humpback Whales and pushing the Steller Sea Lions off of their haul-outs and into the water as the tide continued to rise.
Many of the Steller Sea Lions were fishing this afternoon. Our attention was repeatedly drawn to groups of squawking gulls trying to grab a piece of the sea lion’s catch. Feeding sea lions thrash their prey back and forth at the surface to kill it and often consume it mostly whole. It’s often a fast process and the whole commotion can be over within 30 seconds!
From across the water, we could hear a Humpback Whale repeatedly trumpeting. A group of Steller Sea Lions were harassing Argonaut who was forcefully exhaling at the surface. Sea Lions rolled all over and on top of this Humpback Whale as it swam against the current in the direction of more Sea Lions!?
Other Humpback Whales were focussed on feeding. Frosty and Ripple synchronously lunge fed together on one group of schooling fish (likely herring) as they flew out of the whales mouthes. Frosty also briefly trap fed on this same group of fish. Was Frosty trying to wave some of the last fish into his/her mouth?  Five more Humpbacks were feeding mostly at depth in the tide rips. They surfaced all over the pass as we drifted in the current. Captain Wayne summed it up beautifully, saying that this was as close to heaven as he was ever going to get!

Individuals Identified
Humpback Whales: Conger, Frosty, Ripple, Argonaut, Freckles, Quartz, Ridge, Guardian and Domino.

Captain Wayne’s Quote of the Day
“Worry is interest paid on trouble before it comes due” William R. Inge

Other Wildlife Included:
Pacific Harbour Seals, Steller Sea Lions and Dall’s Porpoises.
Sooty Shearwaters, Pelagic Cormorants, Bald Eagles, Rhinoceros Auklets, Common Murres, Northern Phalaropes, Pacific Loons, Great Blue Herons, Harlequin Ducks and White-winged Scoters.

Next Available Tours:
Thursday October 1 @ 1:00 pm
Friday October 2 @ 1:00 pm
Saturday October 3 @ 1:00 pm

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Tuesday, September 29, 2015 – MV Lukwa

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Photo credit: Alison Ogilvie. Image taken with a telephoto lens and cropped.

Ripple the Humpback Whale trap fed for over 20 minutes this afternoon! We watched in awe as she slowly spun in circles waving small fish into the trap, which was her wide open mouth. Occasionally Ripple’s blowhole would break the surface as she powerfully exhaled at the surface before submerging again. The tip of her rostrum would poke out of the water as she began feeding again, her mouth opening wider and wider still. Looking closely it was even possible to see the small schooling fish (likely herring) that Ripple was waving into her mouth with her pectoral fins. Because the fish were likely spread out, instead of spending energy pursuing her food, Ripple conserved it by remaining stationary and waving the fish into her mouth. Ripple is one of a growing handful of Humpback Whales known by the Marine Education and Research Society (MERS) to utilize this feeding behaviour. It has only been observed by Humpback Whales in the area outside of Telegraph Cove and is always a privilege to witness. To encounter a Humpback Whale trap feeding for such a long period of time is particularly good fortune!
Other activity on the water this afternoon included four more Humpback Whales feeding in the tide rips off of Blackney Pass. Merge and Flash the Humpbacks were traveling tightly together as they rested in Weynton Pass and we watched Argonaut travel through one of our favourite small passes.
Hundreds of Steller Sea Lions were off of OrcaLab again this afternoon, but with the high tide most of them were swimming in the water. Many of these Sea Lions were fishing and some of them could even be seen thrashing around at the surface as they killed and ate their prey.
Flat calm seas and sunshine made for perfect conditions for watching all of today’s activities. We love September!

Individuals Identified
Humpback Whales: Frosty, Ridge, Freckles, Quartz, Ripple, Merge, Flash, Domino and Argonaut.

Captain Wayne’s Quote of the Day
“Continuity in everything is unpleasant” -Blaise Pascal

Other Wildlife Included:
Pacific Harbour Seals, Steller Sea Lions and Dall’s Porpoises.
Sooty Shearwaters, Pelagic Cormorants, Bald Eagles, Rhinoceros Auklets, Common Murres, Northern Phalaropes, Pacific Loons, Great Blue Herons and White-winged Scoters.

Next Available Tours:
Wednesday September 30 @ 1:00 pm
Thursday October 1 @ 1:00 pm
Friday October 2 @ 1:00 pm

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